A #Netfreedom Agenda for the 45th POTUS

presented by Amie Stepanovich, David A. Gross, Daniel Calingaert, Nilmini Rubin, Rebecca MacKinnon

In addi­tion to free­dom to con­nect, there also needs to be the abil­i­ty to con­nect, and that we need to mod­el best prac­tice at home and around the world, and the poli­cies that relate to that.

The Coming War on General Computation

presented by Cory Doctorow

General pur­pose com­put­ers are in fact astound­ing. So astound­ing that our soci­ety is still strug­gling to come to grips with them. To fig­ure out what they’re for. To fig­ure out how to accom­mo­date them and how to cope with them.

Global Capital and Urban Land

presented by Saskia Sassen

For me a city…is a com­plex but incom­plete sys­tem. And in that mix­i­ty of com­plex­i­ty and incom­plete­ness lies the capac­i­ty of cities to have very long lives. Much longer lives than very pow­er­ful cor­po­ra­tions, which often are very closed sys­tems.

Finance is not about Money

presented by Saskia Sassen

I think one first step is to dis­tin­guish between tra­di­tion­al bank­ing, which sells mon­ey it has (or it can bor­row very quick­ly, what­ev­er) and finance, which sells some­thing it does not have. And in that sell­ing what it does not have lies its cre­ativ­i­ty. It has to invent instru­ments. And secondly—and they go together—it has to invade oth­er sec­tors. Because it itself does not have what it needs to pro­duce.

Urbanising Technology

presented by Saskia Sassen

Cities have become sites, places, for mas­sive deploy­ments of increas­ing­ly com­plex and all-encompassing tech­ni­cal sys­tems, some of them good, some of them dubi­ous.

The Future of Smart Cities

presented by Saskia Sassen

For me, the notion of urban­iz­ing tech­nol­o­gy real­ly is part of a larg­er sort of effort that I’ve been work­ing on for a very long time. … [T]echnologies that enable inter­ac­tive domains deliv­er, give, their tech­ni­cal capac­i­ties through ecolo­gies that are more than just the tech­ni­cal capac­i­ty itself.

The Conversation #46 — Mark Mykleby

presented by Aengus Anderson, Mark Mykleby, Neil Prendergast, Micah Saul

Today, in America right now, we only can think of growth in quan­ti­ta­tive terms. And in a resource-constrained envi­ron­ment, how frick­in’ stu­pid is that? You’re actu­al­ly impos­ing your own death sen­tence by not being able to get over the grip of this quan­ti­ta­tive dynam­ic.

Longines Chronoscope 12/07/1951 with Arthur Garfield Hays

presented by Arthur Garfield Hays, Frank Knight, Victor Riesel, William Bradford Huie

This idea of find­ing a com­mu­nist under the bed seems me all non­sense. And the result of the whole thing is that Americans now are so timid about express­ing them­selves that we’ve prac­ti­cal­ly given up demo­c­ra­t­ic meth­ods and free speech. … The result is that we act as one and even on con­tro­ver­sial sub­jects we don’t find any debate in pub­lic life. And don’t dare.

Building Your Own Personal Truth

presented by Euan Semple

I think we are grop­ing towards this idea of truth. And even the word truth can be defined in mul­ti­ple dif­fer­ent ways. So we are by its very nature deal­ing with a very slip­pery top­ic.

Is Digital Culture Responsible for Post-Truth Politics?

presented by Eliane Glaser

I’m going to argue today that even while we know post-truth pol­i­tics is hav­ing a ter­ri­ble effect on our polit­i­cal cul­ture and our role as cit­i­zens, it’s curi­ous­ly dif­fi­cult to com­bat it because of a set of beliefs about what pol­i­tics is, and about the Internet and the way it enables ordi­nary peo­ple to have a voice. And the­se beliefs inter­sect with a pre­vail­ing anti-intellectual anti-elitism which asso­ciates knowl­edge, dis­cern­ment, and truth with snob­bery and pow­er.

Film is Evil, Radio is Good

presented by Richard Nash

By and large images tend to always be in the lead, always run­ning ahead because of ease of con­sump­tion, because it requires less brain pro­cess­ing on our parts. But text is nev­er oblit­er­at­ed.

Programming is Forgetting: Toward a New Hacker Ethic

presented by Allison Parrish

I wouldn’t be sur­prised to find out that many of us here today like to see our work as a con­tin­u­a­tion of say the Tech Model Railroad Club or the Homebrew Computer Club, and cer­tain­ly the ter­mi­nol­o­gy and the val­ues of this con­fer­ence, like open source for exam­ple, have their roots in that era. As a con­se­quence it’s easy to inter­pret any crit­i­cism of the hack­er ethic—which is what I’m about to do—as a kind of assault.

Forbidden Research: Why We Can’t Do That

presented by Alexandra Elbakyan, Karrie Karahalios, J. Nathan Matias

Quite often when we’re ask­ing the­se dif­fi­cult ques­tions we’re ask­ing about ques­tions where we might not even know how to ask where the line is. But in oth­er cas­es, when researchers work to advance pub­lic knowl­edge, even on uncon­tro­ver­sial top­ics, we can still find our­selves for­bid­den from doing the research or dis­sem­i­nat­ing the research.

Beyond Legal Talismans

presented by Kendra Albert

Once we under­stand that legal tal­is­mans are pro­tec­tive invo­ca­tions, we have to be crit­i­cal of them. Even the ones we like. The short­hand is not com­pre­hen­si­ble to users. And the short­hand is not com­pre­hen­si­ble to peo­ple more gen­er­al­ly.

Longines Chronoscope 06/25/1952 with Senator Joseph R. McCarthy

presented by Donald I. Rogers, Joseph R. McCarthy, William Bradford Huie

I may say this, that if the Republicans should take over the Senate, I hap­pen to be the rank­ing mem­ber on the inves­ti­gat­ing com­mit­tee. That means that McCarthy would become Chairman of the Senate Investigating Committee. And if he does, I’ll make you one promise. That Leavenworth won’t hold them, Mr. Huie.

Longines Chronoscope 09/29/1952 with Senator Joseph R. McCarthy

presented by Frank Knight, Henry Hazlitt, Joseph R. McCarthy, William Bradford Huie

You see, I’ve got a very strong feel­ing that most of our peo­ple in pub­lic life under­es­ti­mate the intel­li­gence of the American peo­ple. And they try to argue and tell peo­ple how to vote. I think you need mere­ly give the peo­ple the facts, and then you can go home and don’t wor­ry. They’ll vote right. 

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