Tim Hwang on New Media 360

presented by Tim Hwang

We iden­ti­fied a group of users on Twitter and we said as a cod­ing chal­lenge, like social bat­tle­bots, write a bot that will embed itself in this net­work and we will score you based on how well these bots are able to achieve some kind of social change, either in the pat­tern of con­nec­tions between peo­ple or in the things that peo­ple talk about.

Filippo Menczer on Truthy Tweeting

presented by Filippo Menczer

I’m here to tell you lit­tle bit about a few exam­ples of truthy memes that we’ve uncov­ered with the sys­tem that we have online. It’s a web site where we track memes com­ing out of Twitter and we try to see if we could spot some sig­na­tures based on the net­works of who retweets what, basi­cal­ly, and who men­tions whom.

Melanie Sloan on New Media 360

presented by Melanie Sloan

As Executive Director of each of these orga­ni­za­tions what Mr. Berman does is he con­tracts with his own pub­lic rela­tions firm, Berman and Company. And all of the staff of Berman and Company then serve as the staff of these dif­fer­ent orga­ni­za­tions, and they will often have very dif­fer­ent titles in all of these dif­fer­ent orga­ni­za­tions but it’s the same group of about four peo­ple.

Money, Power, and the Networked Public Sphere

presented by Yochai Benkler

Bill Keller ends his sto­ry in the end in The New York Times Magazine as, If Assange were an under­stat­ed pro­fes­so­r­i­al type rather than a char­ac­ter from a miss­ing Stieg Larsson nov­el, and if WikiLeaks were not suf­fused with such glib antipa­thy toward the US, would the reac­tion to the leaks be quite so fero­cious?”

Good ques­tion. Who’s respon­si­ble? Half an arti­cle before, Keller says, I came to think of Julian Assange as a char­ac­ter from a Stieg Larsson movie.

Wendell Potter on Deadly Spin

presented by Wendell Potter

Today, because of the dig­i­tal media, big com­pa­nies are able to get their pro­pa­gan­da direct­ly to their tar­get audi­ences, as I was able to do. They can and they do pub­lish and dis­sem­i­nate their own press releas­es, and their own stud­ies, and their own posi­tion papers. All this means that the con­sumer is often, if not most of the time, at a big dis­ad­van­tage.

Virtual Futures Podcast #7: Trust Shift, with Rachel Botsman

presented by Luke Robert Mason, Rachel Botsman

We rarely think about the link between trust and progress and inno­va­tion, and how soci­eties move for­ward. But when you start to think of it like that, you real­ize that trust is actu­al­ly the key com­po­nent not just for com­pa­nies but any orga­ni­za­tion that wants human beings to try new things.

Welcome to the Entreprecariat — Disrupting Precarization

presented by Silvio Lorusso

The rec­i­p­ro­cal influ­ence between an entre­pre­neuri­al­ist regime and per­va­sive pre­car­i­ty, their ambiva­lent coex­is­tence, is what the con­cept of the entrep­re­cari­at refers to. To artic­u­late some of the ways in which this mutu­al influ­ence takes place, I’d like to intro­duce what I would call a pos­tu­late of the entrep­re­cari­at. So here it is: The more pre­car­i­ty is present, the less entre­pre­neuri­al­ism is vol­un­tary.

Biohacking: The Moral Imperative to Build a Better You

presented by Tim Cannon

I think that we have a moral imper­a­tive to change the human being, giv­en the fact that we are built so flawed and built for a time that we no longer live in. There’s a pret­ty per­va­sive belief that we kind of stopped evolv­ing from the neck up. And that we don’t have behav­iors that are actu­al­ly stuck inside the human being, and ways in which we’re in this sort of evo­lu­tion­ary lock­step with what we used to be, and not what we are and what we’ve become.

You Are Not a Digital Native (and that’s OK)

presented by Cory Doctorow

You may have heard peo­ple come up to you and say like, Hey, you’re young. That makes you a dig­i­tal native.” Something about being born after the mil­len­ni­um or born after 1995 or what­ev­er, that makes you sort of mys­ti­cal­ly tuned in to what the Internet is for, and any­thing that you do on the Internet must be what the Internet is actu­al­ly for. And I’m here to tell you that you’re not a dig­i­tal native. That you’re just some­one who uses com­put­ers, and you’re no bet­ter and no worse than the rest of us at using com­put­ers.

The Conversation #52 — Walter Block

presented by Aengus Anderson, Micah Saul, Neil Prendergast, Walter Block

Benevolence isn’t inef­fi­cient and I’m a big fan of benev­o­lence. It’s just that it’s not enough. It’s okay for a group of twenty-five or fifty peo­ple where every­one knows every­one. But when you have 300 mil­lion in the US or 7 bil­lion in the world, if we were self-sufficient and we had to pro­duce every­thing for our­selves we’d all die, or 99% of us would die. So we have to coop­er­ate with each oth­er. But the only way to coop­er­ate with each oth­er in such large num­bers is through mar­kets.

Everybody Runs

presented by Ingrid Burrington

I’ve been try­ing to get as many weird futures on the table as pos­si­ble because the truth is there are these sort of ubiq­ui­tous futures, right. Ideas about how the world should or will be that have become this sort of main­stream, dom­i­nat­ing ver­nac­u­lar that’s pri­mar­i­ly kind of about a very white Western mas­cu­line vision of the future, and it kind of col­o­nized the abil­i­ty to think about and imag­ine tech­nol­o­gy in the future.

Inform/Transform: Translating Critical Tech Perspectives

presented by Zara Rahman

Over the past cou­ple of years, it feels like civ­il soci­ety has been almost over­whelmed with promis­es of how tech­nol­o­gy can sud­den­ly mag­i­cal­ly solve the prob­lems that we’re try­ing to address. Some com­ing from tech giants who say they’ve devel­oped some sem­blance of social con­science sud­den­ly. Some from star­tups who see a prob­lem and think that tech­nol­o­gy can help with­out think­ing about the sys­temic issues under­ly­ing it.

The Entropy of a System

presented by Tega Brain

I’m par­tic­u­lar­ly con­cerned with how to design from the dystopi­an posi­tion of the Anthropocene. How to make cre­ative work that is simul­ta­ne­ous­ly crit­i­cal and gen­er­a­tive. What does it mean to have aug­ment­ed the atmos­phere and the ocean’s capac­i­ty to absorb heat? And to be rapid­ly increas­ing the entropy of those sys­tems?

Where Are The Black Designers?

presented by Maurice Cherry

How many black design­ers do you know? If you find that there’s not many or you don’t know any at all, that’s actu­al­ly per­fect­ly okay. That’s fine. And part of the rea­son­ing I think behind this is that you know, we don’t real­ly know where they are. We don’t see them because they’re not reflect­ed in our design media.

Defying Faith

presented by Eric Salobir, Jonathan Zittrain, Maria Zuber

The chal­lenge for the Church and for the the­olo­gians was to say okay, per­haps that’s what is writ­ten. But for exam­ple if you con­sid­er that God has deliv­ered the Creation in sev­en days, know­ing that nowa­days Amazon can deliv­er every­thing on Earth overnight, it means that Jeff Bezos has defeat­ed God? Or does it mean some­thing dif­fer­ent? And I think it means prob­a­bly some­thing dif­fer­ent.

Loving Out Loud in a Time of Hate Speech

presented by Jillian C York

Dangerous speech, as opposed hate speech, is defined basi­cal­ly as speech that seeks to incite vio­lence against peo­ple. And that’s the kind of speech that I’m real­ly con­cerned about right now. That’s what we’re see­ing on the rise in the United States, in Europe, and else­where.

Virtual Futures Podcast #6: Virtual Therapy, with Michael Carthy

presented by Luke Robert Mason, Michael Carthy

Traditional psy­chol­o­gy and coun­sel­ing will help peo­ple under­stand in a very lin­ear way why they are the way they are. Whereas what I’m real­ly focused on and what I’ve been spe­cial­iz­ing in for the last num­ber of years is the how. And for me, vir­tu­al real­i­ty ther­a­py is the how of change.

Virtual Futures Podcast #5: Electronic Waste, with Dani Ploeger

presented by Dani Ploeger, Luke Robert Mason

This idea of (re)performing the posthu­man was pret­ty much based on a desire to talk about the cyborg ten years after, or fif­teen years, twen­ty years after the Cyborg Manifesto and Katherine Hayles’ book became famous. And to really—yeah, to talk about maybe the nor­mal cyborg, the nor­mal tech­nol­o­gized body. You know, tech­nol­o­gy in the every­day and its impli­ca­tions for the way we per­ceive and expe­ri­ence our bod­ies.

Virtual Futures Podcast #4: Emoji Delights, with Carla Gannis

presented by Carla Gannis, Luke Robert Mason

AR mixed real­i­ty has more poten­tial, I think. With vir­tu­al real­i­ty, you’re just some­where else alto­geth­er, right? And VR is all the rage right now. But in terms of dis­sem­i­nat­ing infor­ma­tion, in terms of keep­ing us in touch still with phys­i­cal, you know. I mean, it’s all real life now. I don’t even dis­tin­guish IRL/URL now. I mean it’s all real life. But like, how do we main­tain a foot in both simul­ta­ne­ous­ly? Both the vir­tu­al and the phys­i­cal.

Virtual Futures Podcast #3: Transhumanism and Risk, with Professor Steve Fuller

presented by Luke Robert Mason, Steve Fuller

Humanity 2.0 starts to chal­lenge a lot of the assump­tions of Humanity 1.0, espe­cial­ly in terms of issues hav­ing to do with lim­i­ta­tions. So in oth­er words, you might say there are two ways to go on Humanity 2.0. And in my writ­ing, I asso­ciate these with the tran­shu­man and the posthu­man, respec­tive­ly.

Virtual Futures Podcast #2: Cybersex, with Dr. Trudy Barber

presented by Luke Robert Mason, Trudy Barber

So then I thought right, what hap­pens with an artist who draws the body, who deals with the body all the time? I know, they have affairs with the life mod­el, don’t they? They have their muse. So I thought right, let’s take this, let’s look at tech­nol­o­gy, let’s have an affair with this tech. Let’s try and put the sex into it. Let’s sex up the tech­nol­o­gy.

Virtual Futures Podcast #1: Cyborg Experiments, with Professor Kevin Warwick

presented by Kevin Warwick, Luke Robert Mason

Humans, we’re pret­ty lim­it­ed in what we can do, let’s face it, men­tal­ly par­tic­u­lar­ly. We just have a bunch of brain cells. And the pos­si­bil­i­ty of enhanc­ing our brain, our men­tal capa­bil­i­ties, I think is enor­mous.

Ex Oriente Make
The Future of Maker Culture is Made in China

presented by Silvia Lindtner

Making took rise at a moment when peo­ple began— Not just schol­ars but also media—pub­lic media and peo­ple work­ing in the tech industry—began cri­tiquing ear­li­er visions and ideas of the knowl­edge econ­o­my and say­ing the knowl­edge econ­o­my, or ideas like the cre­ative class as prop­a­gat­ed by Richard Florida, were sharply cri­tiqued because they did not deliv­er what they had orig­i­nal­ly promised.

The Conversation #51 — Phyllis Tickle

presented by Aengus Anderson, Micah Saul, Phyllis Tickle

Historians get real­ly ner­vous about pat­terns. That’s chang­ing a bit now. And the truth of it is there’s not much way to avoid the 500-year cycle. You almost have to work too hard to unsay it, it’s so obvi­ous­ly there in every way. And if you say every 500 years we go through one, then you imme­di­ate­ly say we’re in the 21st cen­tu­ry and baby are we going through one.

The Conspiracy Trap

presented by Masha Gessen

Conspiracies are per­fect for sim­ple think­ing. Because con­spir­a­cy is by def­i­n­i­tion some­thing that explains every­thing. A real­ly great con­spir­a­cy explains some­thing that has already hap­pened and some­thing that’s going to hap­pen.

Define American

presented by Jose Antonio Vargas

The real­i­ty is we have been so busy call­ing peo­ple names, obsess­ing over bor­ders and walls, and spread­ing mis­in­for­ma­tion that we haven’t even asked hard ques­tions like why do peo­ple move? What does US for­eign pol­i­cy and US trade agree­ments have to do with migra­tion pat­terns? Remember when those chil­dren start­ed walk­ing from Central America to here, and CBS News and a lot of orga­ni­za­tions called them ille­gal immi­grant” chil­dren instead of call­ing them the refugees that they are? What did we do to Nicaragua, El Salvador, and Guatemala so that their coun­tries got so vio­lent that they have to come here? Who start­ed the drug war? What did NAFTA do not only to the United States but to Mexicans, right?

The Conversation #49 — Scott Douglas

presented by Aengus Anderson, Micah Saul, Scott Douglas

People think that the Civil Rights Movement and all big epochal move­ments involve con­science, and they do. They also involve con­scious­ness. I mean, you can’t strug­gle against what you’re unaware off, right? The Klan as the icon­ic car­ri­ers of vio­lence, the Bull Connor of the icon­ic south­ern white male resis­tance, George Wallace the icon­ic neopop­ulist racist. You know, these were his­toric fig­ures in myth and real­i­ty. But we wouldn’t get to what they rep­re­sent­ed till much lat­er.

I Dreamed a Dream: Politics in the Age of Mass Art Production

presented by Hito Steyerl

Let’s ask a very sim­ple ques­tion. Why are there so many art projects today? Because we live in the world of mass art pro­duc­tion. Basically every­one is an artist nowa­days. Or at least he or she has an artis­tic project. We can speak of a surge in the cre­ation of art. The pro­duc­tion of art is pro­lif­er­at­ing.

MIT Media Lab Defiance: Introduction

presented by Ethan Zuckerman, Joi Ito

Part of what’s real­ly inter­est­ing at the moment is that most peo­ple, par­tic­u­lar­ly young peo­ple, don’t have a lot of faith in insti­tu­tions. They’re not nec­es­sar­i­ly excit­ed about this idea that we go to the polls, we elect rep­re­sen­ta­tives, those rep­re­sen­ta­tives speak for us and that is how change hap­pens.

Rebel Scientists

presented by G. Pascal Zachary

I’m going to make an argu­ment in this talk that dis­sent is valu­able not mere­ly to estab­lish your moral dimen­sion or to make a moral act or moral pos­ture. It’s essen­tial to sci­en­tif­ic progress. So we can’t do with­out dis­sent; it’s not an affec­ta­tion.

Ethical Machines episode 4: David J. Klein

presented by David J. Klein, Roelof Pieters, Samim Winiger

One of the most impor­tant insights that I’ve got­ten in work­ing with biol­o­gists and ecol­o­gists is that today it’s actu­al­ly not real­ly known on a sci­en­tif­ic basis how well dif­fer­ent con­ser­va­tion inter­ven­tions will work. And it’s because we just don’t have a lot of data.

Ethical Machines episode 3: Alex J. Champandard and Gene Kogan

presented by Alex J. Champandard, Gene Kogan, Roelof Pieters, Samim Winiger

For any artists that are work­ing in this field now, if I was good at paint­ing I’d prob­a­bly be look­ing at how to find styles that work well with these kind of rep­re­sen­ta­tions and make them eas­i­ly automat­able or trans­fer­able so that if I had fans as an artist they could say, Hey, I would like to have a pic­ture of my cat paint­ed.”

Ethical Machines episode 2: Jack Clark

presented by Jack Clark, Roelof Pieters, Samim Winiger

If you think about it what we’re doing is we’re turn­ing very high-dimensional math­e­mat­ic rep­re­sen­ta­tions of a sort of large knowl­edge space into intel­lec­tu­al prop­er­ty. Which should be the most fright­en­ing idea in the world to any­one. This is from most abstract thing you could pos­si­bly try and turn into a cap­i­tal­ist object.

The Stupefying Smart City

presented by Richard Sennett

What I’m wor­ried about is that with the tech­no­log­i­cal tools that we have today, as in the past, our first use of them is the least inven­tive that we can make. And the issue is how urban­ists can actu­al­ly use these new tools well rather than use them in a way which is harm­ful.

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