Tim Cannon Grinder Perspective Gene Editing

Grinder Perspective on Gene Editing Tech

presented by Tim Cannon

I think when you start using this tech­nol­o­gy for enhance­ment, that’s when you start to get into the domain of bio­hack­ing and kind of human aug­men­ta­tion. Well, I believe that this is a very fer­tile ground for peo­ple to explore, and I think that this involves will­ing par­tic­i­pants who are try­ing to find out more about the world around them and try­ing to enhance the human expe­ri­ence. And I think we need to allow that inno­va­tion to take place.

Forbidden Research Cant Do That

Forbidden Research: Why We Can’t Do That

presented by J. Nathan Matias, Karrie Karahalios, Alexandra Elbakyan

Quite often when we’re ask­ing the­se dif­fi­cult ques­tions we’re ask­ing about ques­tions where we might not even know how to ask where the line is. But in oth­er cas­es, when researchers work to advance pub­lic knowl­edge, even on uncon­tro­ver­sial top­ics, we can still find our­selves for­bid­den from doing the research or dis­sem­i­nat­ing the research.

Parag Khanna Ideal World

Parag Khanna on the Ideal World

presented by Parag Khanna

For most peo­ple on an indi­vid­u­al lev­el most the time, their future still feels very dif­fer­ent from that of oth­er peo­ple. We live in a world, for exam­ple, of enor­mous income inequal­i­ty, right. So even though there is a glob­al econ­o­my, it cer­tain­ly doesn’t feel like one’s sort of day-to-day fate or des­tiny is linked to those of peo­ple around the world, even if it is in very invis­i­ble kinds of ways.

Kendra Albert Legal Talismans

Beyond Legal Talismans

presented by Kendra Albert

Once we under­stand that legal tal­is­mans are pro­tec­tive invo­ca­tions, we have to be crit­i­cal of them. Even the ones we like. The short­hand is not com­pre­hen­si­ble to users. And the short­hand is not com­pre­hen­si­ble to peo­ple more gen­er­al­ly.

Steven Pinker Doom Not Inevitable

Steven Pinker on Why Doom is not Inevitable

presented by Steven Pinker

I don’t think that any­thing will save the world in the sense of bring­ing Utopia to Earth. But I think the world could be improved, and that would be the ver­sion of the ques­tion that I’m very much inter­est­ed in.

Margaret Atwood Fiction Future Environment

Margaret Atwood on Fiction, the Future, and the Environment

presented by Margaret Atwood

We have already changed the world a lot, not always for the bet­ter. Some of it’s for the bet­ter, as far as we human beings are con­cerned. But every time we invent a new tech­nol­o­gy, we like to play with that tech­nol­o­gy, and we don’t always fore­see the con­se­quences.

John Gray Man Beliefs Changes

John Gray on Man, Beliefs, and Changes

presented by John Gray

One of the prob­lems here, of course, is that there’s no we.” Who’s we? I mean, humanity’s composed—the human species is composed—of bil­lions of sep­a­rate indi­vid­u­als with dif­fer­ent goals, dif­fer­ent plans, dif­fer­ent val­ues, and dif­fer­ent ide­als.

Steven Pinker Genetically Reengineering Human Nature

Steven Pinker on Genetically Re-engineering Human Nature

presented by Steven Pinker

There are many changes to our insti­tu­tions and our norms and our ideas that can reduce or elim­i­nate the risks of nuclear war with­out what I con­sid­er a rather quixotic attempt to change the course of human evo­lu­tion.

Vint Cerf Arete Medallion Qa

Vint Cerf Areté Medallion Q&A Elon University 2016

presented by Lee Rainie, Vint Cerf

We’ve already been through sev­er­al sit­u­a­tions where new tech­nolo­gies come along. The Industrial Revolution removed a large num­ber of jobs that had been done by hand, replaced them with machi­nes. But the machi­nes had to be built, the machi­nes had to be oper­at­ed, the machi­nes had to be main­tained. And the same is true in this online envi­ron­ment.

Longines Chronoscope Joseph Mccarthy 017

Longines Chronoscope 06/25/1952 with Senator Joseph R. McCarthy

presented by Joseph R. McCarthy, William Bradford Huie, Donald I. Rogers

I may say this, that if the Republicans should take over the Senate, I hap­pen to be the rank­ing mem­ber on the inves­ti­gat­ing com­mit­tee. That means that McCarthy would become Chairman of the Senate Investigating Committee. And if he does, I’ll make you one promise. That Leavenworth won’t hold them, Mr. Huie.

Longines Chronoscope Joseph Mccarthy 015

Longines Chronoscope 09/29/1952 with Senator Joseph R. McCarthy

presented by Joseph R. McCarthy, William Bradford Huie, Henry Hazlitt, Frank Knight

You see, I’ve got a very strong feel­ing that most of our peo­ple in pub­lic life under­es­ti­mate the intel­li­gence of the American peo­ple. And they try to argue and tell peo­ple how to vote. I think you need mere­ly give the peo­ple the facts, and then you can go home and don’t wor­ry. They’ll vote right. 

The Conversation #45 — James Bamford

presented by Micah Saul, James Bamford, Aengus Anderson

You’re not going to get a gen­er­a­tion of peo­ple out­raged that somebody’s read­ing their email like you would’ve in the 70s get­ting a gen­er­a­tion of peo­ple out­raged that you’re read­ing their snail mail.

Harnessing Ai Target Conservation Carla Gomes

Harnessing Artificial Intelligence to Target Conservation Efforts

presented by Carla Gomes

The smart­phone is the ulti­mate exam­ple of a uni­ver­sal com­put­er. Apps trans­form the phone into dif­fer­ent devices. Unfortunately, the com­pu­ta­tion­al rev­o­lu­tion has done lit­tle for the sus­tain­abil­i­ty of our Earth. Yet, sus­tain­abil­i­ty prob­lems are unique in scale and com­plex­i­ty, often involv­ing sig­nif­i­cant com­pu­ta­tion­al chal­lenges.

Tai Sing Lee Machine Imagination

Teaching a Machine How to Imagine

presented by Tai Sing Lee

We can train com­put­ers to learn to rec­og­nize objects by giv­ing them mil­lions of exam­ples with the cor­rect answers. A human baby, on the oth­er hand, learns to rec­og­nize many con­cepts and objects all by them­self sim­ply by inter­act­ing with a few exam­ples in the real world.

Elif Shafak Womens Rights 004

Elif Şafak Makes a Case for Women’s Rights in the Middle East

presented by Elif Şafak

One of the pri­ma­ry ques­tions, or prob­lems as I see it, is this illu­sion” that same­ness will bring safe­ty. People start to think­ing that if we are sur­round­ed by sim­i­lar peo­ple, like-minded peo­ple, if we have com­mu­ni­ties based on same­ness, that will bring us safe­ty. That’s an illu­sion. That’s not the case at all. 

Elif Shafak Learning From Past 010

Elif Şafak on Memory and Learning from the Past

presented by Elif Şafak

When I look at the signs today, I see a very strong trend back to what I call trib­al­ism, back to nation-states, nation­al­ism, reli­gios­i­ty, all those divi­sive forces that many intel­lec­tu­als in the 1940s, ‘50s, thought were going to dis­ap­pear grad­u­al­ly. That did not hap­pen.

Quinn Norton Network Of Sorrows

A Network of Sorrows: Small Adversaries and Small Allies

presented by Quinn Norton

In an envi­ron­ment where every­body can pick up everybody’s tools, we’re all weird­ly empow­ered now. And I mean kind of weird in an almost fey sense like, our pow­ers are weird, they make us weird, and they make our our con­flicts weird. It’s again that idea that our tools are inter­act­ing with our human flaws in real­ly real­ly inter­est­ing ways.

Geek of the Week: Brewster Kahle

presented by Brewster Kahle

We’re at a thou­sand dol­lars per giga­byte, which is what cur­rent disk dri­ves cost. The twen­ty ter­abytes that peo­ple esti­mate in ASCII that’s in the Library of Congress is just twen­ty mil­lion dol­lars. So that’s not very much mon­ey in terms of being able to store and retrieve [crosstalk] the Library of Congress.

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