Mythophysics of the New Normal

presented by Kevin Slavin, Warren Ellis

The future is on the whole a won­der­ful thing because it will bring us new things that we haven’t seen before. And that’s why we stick around.

Discovering Health Innovations in Humanitarian Settings

presented by Kamalini Lokuge

During the war in Afghanistan, the mil­i­tary decid­ed to air drop food pack­ages as part of its win­ning hearts and minds cam­paign. Unfortunately, the food pack­ages were very sim­i­lar in appear­ance to the clus­ter bombs they were drop­ping at the same time. If mil­i­tary decision-makers had spo­ken to com­mu­ni­ties, aid work­ers, mil­i­tary per­son­nel on the ground, they’d have fig­ured out there were smarter ways to deliv­er food and win the trust of the Afghan peo­ple.

Kenneth Goldsmith at The Influencers 2016

presented by Kenneth Goldsmith

I think that what I want to say is that the polemics around the dis­course of the Web are too bina­ry. I think that one of the prob­lems that we have in the­o­riz­ing the Web is that we tend to mor­al­ize it in bina­ries. I get it. It’s bad. The Web is bad for you. Or the sort of free cul­ture is always like, It’s real­ly good. It’s great. Free cul­ture is great.” It’s nei­ther.

Feral Urbanism

presented by AbdouMaliq Simone

There seems to be a rush to exceed time, to pro­duce urban envi­ron­ment and social­i­ty for which we have no lan­guage, some­thing that goes beyond spec­u­la­tion, some­thing cut loose from hav­ing to make sense now. The city cut loose from what it had embod­ied or promised.

Tim Berners-Lee Announces the World Wide Web Foundation

presented by Tim Berners-Lee

I wrote a memo say­ing, We should have a glob­al hyper­text sys­tem to fix this.” The memo, I dis­trib­ut­ed it to a few peo­ple but there’s nowhere real­ly to dis­trib­ute it to at CERN because CERN is a physics lab. It didn’t have com­mit­tees for build­ing pro­grams and hyper­text sys­tems.

So what hap­pened was basi­cal­ly noth­ing for eigh­teen months.

Evgeny Morozov on Silicon Valley Solutionism

presented by Evgeny Morozov

There is this bias in soci­ety that as long as you have more infor­ma­tion things are auto­mat­i­cal­ly bet­ter because you have more knowl­edge. It’s a bias that goes all the way back to the Enlightenment.

Evgeny Morozov on the Kingdom of Geeks

presented by Evgeny Morozov

There is this very bizarre alliance between world-changing geeks on the one hand and pol­i­cy­mak­ers who only care about out­comes. They no longer care about how those out­comes are arrived at. They have stripped pol­i­tics of all mean­ing. All they want is to get peo­ple to do the right thing. They don’t care why they do it.

The Algorithmic Spiral of Silence

presented by Zeynep Tufekci

A cou­ple of major plat­forms like Facebook and Twitter, YouTube, have become in many places around the world a de fac­to pub­lic sphere. Especially in coun­tries that have less than free Internet, less than free mass media. And the­se coun­tries have tran­si­tioned from a very con­trolled pub­lic sphere to a commercially-run one like Facebook.

The Ethics of Open Source

presented by Ashe Dryden

This talk is more about the coer­cion of labor into open source soft­ware. So I want to take a crit­i­cal look at how we can engage busi­ness­es and oth­er stake­hold­ers in tech­nol­o­gy com­pa­nies to begin to cre­ate a more equal and sus­tain­able envi­ron­ment for all peo­ple con­tribut­ing to open source.

Lawrence Landweber’s Internet Hall of Fame 2012 Profile

presented by Lawrence Landweber

I got involved with net­work­ing some­time in the late 70s, main­ly because I was look­ing around and dis­cov­er­ing that peo­ple were get­ting into net­work­ing, email. And at the time I was depart­ment chair at University of Wisconsin, the com­put­er sci­ence depart­ment, and was try­ing to under­stand what those capa­bil­i­ties would do for our fac­ul­ty and stu­dents.

Elizabeth Feinler’s Internet Hall of Fame 2012 Profile

presented by Elizabeth Feinler

I’m Elizabeth Feinler, usu­al­ly known as Jake.” That’s my nick­name. And I ran the con­tract for the Network Information Center on both the ARPANET and the Defense Data Network back in the 70s and 80s.

Nancy Hafkin’s Internet Hall of Fame 2012 Profile

presented by Nancy Hafkin

I think my proud­est achieve­ments were to be able to set up and launch the first pro­gram at the United Nations to pro­mote infor­ma­tion tech­nol­o­gy in a region. And the region was of course Africa.

Steve Crocker’s Internet Hall of Fame 2012 Profile

presented by Steve Crocker

I’ve been involved with the Internet Society for vir­tu­al­ly its entire life. Years ago, I had the good for­tune to be involved with the ear­ly days of the ARPANET and played a small role in help­ing build some of the tech­nol­o­gy, and in build­ing some of the social struc­tures that brought every­body togeth­er.

Surveillance and Race Online

presented by Simone Browne

[The] ques­tion of what hap­pens when black­ness enters the frame can kind of neat­ly encap­su­late the ways I’ve been think­ing and try­ing to talk about sur­veil­lance for the last few years.

Indie Music and the Web

presented by Maggie Vail

I think it’s deeply impor­tant that we add a work­ing knowl­edge of busi­ness and busi­ness mod­els to what it means to be web-literate. The sites that we use, there’s big mon­ey behind them, and there’s even big­ger prof­it motives in front of them. We need to be able to think crit­i­cal­ly about where we build our com­mu­ni­ties, about what they’re doing with our data, and about when—not if—they mon­e­tize us.

Critical Computing: Using Computers for Social Awareness and Empowerment

presented by Fox Harrell

In the real world we can cre­ative­ly rep­re­sent our­selves in dynam­ic ways. So, we can vary our ges­ture, our dis­course, our pos­ture, our fash­ion, life sto­ries, the way we tell our sto­ries. And all of this is with an astound­ing sen­si­tiv­i­ty to social con­text. Computer tech­nolo­gies like com­put­er games, social net­work­ing, and vir­tu­al worlds are much more prim­i­tive than what we do in the real world.

Malia Lazu, Black Reality 2.0: Creating and Making in the Digital Age

presented by Malia Lazu

I became tired of knock­ing on the same doors and either see­ing the same peo­ple or dif­fer­ent peo­ple. But I real­ly just felt like I was in this cycle of faux lib­er­a­tion, where I would feel a vic­to­ry, and the vic­to­ry was prob­a­bly formed around the RFP for the grant that we need­ed to get in order to do our work.

Nnenna Nwakanma Keynote at Internetdagarna 2015

presented by Nnenna Nwakanma

In Europe, there are about fifty-odd coun­tries, and about 725 mil­lion peo­ple. That’s about the pop­u­la­tion of Europe at the moment. What’s the largest coun­try in Europe in terms of pop­u­la­tion? Russia is. Russia has about 144 mil­lion, 145 mil­lion. But Nigeria has more than 170 mil­lion, and there are only about 40% of Nigerians who are con­nect­ed.

Certain Blacks: Future Frames from the Liberated Zone

presented by Makani Themba

I want us to play togeth­er… I’ve been think­ing a lot about the black future. One, because I want to have one. Personally, I would like a black future. Because I want a future. And then I was think­ing about just how many folks don’t actu­al­ly put black and the future togeth­er.

Opal Tometi Keynote, Marching in the Arc of Justice Conference

presented by Opal Tometi

It’s para­mount that our soci­ety rec­og­nize the role of anti-black struc­tural racism in the US. And that our 21st cen­tu­ry mul­tira­cial social move­ments uplift and cen­tral­ize the issues of those com­mu­ni­ty mem­bers who are impact­ed and are liv­ing at the mar­gins. We know that if we do, we’ll get closer to real jus­tice for all of us. Moreover, it’s been wide­ly doc­u­ment­ed that the gains made by and with the black com­mu­ni­ty have always led to bet­ter stan­dards of liv­ing for all of us.

The Coming War on General Computation

presented by Cory Doctorow

General pur­pose com­put­ers are in fact astound­ing. So astound­ing that our soci­ety is still strug­gling to come to grips with them. To fig­ure out what they’re for. To fig­ure out how to accom­mo­date them and how to cope with them.

Global Capital and Urban Land

presented by Saskia Sassen

For me a city…is a com­plex but incom­plete sys­tem. And in that mix­i­ty of com­plex­i­ty and incom­plete­ness lies the capac­i­ty of cities to have very long lives. Much longer lives than very pow­er­ful cor­po­ra­tions, which often are very closed sys­tems.

Finance is not about Money

presented by Saskia Sassen

I think one first step is to dis­tin­guish between tra­di­tion­al bank­ing, which sells mon­ey it has (or it can bor­row very quick­ly, what­ev­er) and finance, which sells some­thing it does not have. And in that sell­ing what it does not have lies its cre­ativ­i­ty. It has to invent instru­ments. And secondly—and they go together—it has to invade oth­er sec­tors. Because it itself does not have what it needs to pro­duce.

Urbanising Technology

presented by Saskia Sassen

Cities have become sites, places, for mas­sive deploy­ments of increas­ing­ly com­plex and all-encompassing tech­ni­cal sys­tems, some of them good, some of them dubi­ous.

The Future of Smart Cities

presented by Saskia Sassen

For me, the notion of urban­iz­ing tech­nol­o­gy real­ly is part of a larg­er sort of effort that I’ve been work­ing on for a very long time. … [T]echnologies that enable inter­ac­tive domains deliv­er, give, their tech­ni­cal capac­i­ties through ecolo­gies that are more than just the tech­ni­cal capac­i­ty itself.

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