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Sidney Blumenthal on Being Advisor to Hillary Clinton

presented by Sidney Blumenthal, Rob Riemen

I have known Hillary for almost thir­ty years. And I hope that when this con­fer­ence takes place, she’s been elect­ed pres­i­dent. We share com­mon val­ues, polit­i­cal val­ues. But also I think that these are deeply root­ed in our own per­son­al expe­ri­ences. And these val­ues we’ve defend­ed against all sorts of peo­ple who have used what­ev­er means that they could, many of them under­hand­ed, in order to try and destroy rep­u­ta­tions, attack peo­ple per­son­al­ly, to engage in what we’ve called the pol­i­tics of per­son­al destruc­tion, but for polit­i­cal advan­tage and gain.

A Waste of Waste

presented by Arielle Johnson

My job is to work with cooks to fig­ure out the sci­ence behind food and cook­ing. But some­thing that we’re also inter­est­ed in with my job is using the knowl­edge that we pro­duce by doing that to improve the world.

The Domains of Identity & Self-Sovereign Identity

presented by Kaliya Young

Self-sovereign iden­ti­ty is what sits in the mid­dle enabling indi­vid­u­als to man­age all these dif­fer­ent rela­tion­ships in a way that is sig­nif­i­cant­ly less com­plex than each of those insti­tu­tions need­ing to have a busi­ness rela­tion­ship with each oth­er to see those cre­den­tials.

A Future with­out Waste

presented by Ida Auken

What I want to tell you is that in 2050 we don’t even have waste any­more. There will be no waste in 2050. Everything will be seen as a trea­sure, because we will have cre­at­ed what some smart peo­ple call a cir­cu­lar econ­o­my.

Empathy Reifies Disability Stigmas

presented by Liz Jackson

I think we need to start think­ing crit­i­cal­ly about things that we per­ceive as whole­some. Empathy has become a big busi­ness, and we ought to be able to exam­ine it. Everyone’s always try­ing to diag­nose dis­abled peo­ple. But I’m gonna have a lit­tle bit of fun. And I’m actu­al­ly gonna diag­nose all of you.

Designing for Data Literacy in the Age of Post-Truth

presented by Holger Kuehnle

We should use our tool­box to make com­plex­i­ty under­stand­able. We need to use the tools at our dis­pos­al to build data lit­er­a­cy by show­ing the con­text that data exists in. Because with that data, and with con­text around the data, we’ll be able to build under­stand­ing…

Deep Sensing

presented by Jay Springett

When we think about short-term think­ing, how short-term is short-term? Because if you plant a tree, like an oak tree, it takes 100 to 120 years for an oak tree to be ful­ly grown. So any­thing between the point in which you plant the tree to when the tree is ful­ly grown is short-term think­ing, when we speak about land.

The Divided States of America

presented by Jeb Bush, Rob Riemen, Roger Berkowitz, Sean Wilentz, Randall Kennedy

I think there’s a great deal of naiveté about how pol­i­tics actu­al­ly works. And this is where either wing—the Trump wing or the Sanders wing—don’t under­stand how pol­i­tics actu­al­ly works in Washington.

SolarPunk and Going Post-Post-Apocalyptic

presented by Andrew Hudson, Geraldine de Bastion, Maya Indira Ganesh, Mushon Zer-Aviv, Steve Lambert

Cyberpunks, they’re out pirat­ing data and upload­ing their brains into video games. Solarpunks are revi­tal­iz­ing water­sheds, map­ping radi­a­tion after dis­as­ter or war, and bring­ing back pol­li­na­tor pop­u­la­tions. And since all great spec­u­la­tive fic­tion is real­ly not about the future but about about the present, cyber­punk is about the pol­i­tics of the 1980s, right. It was about urban decay and cor­po­rate pow­er and glob­al­iza­tion. In the same way, solarpunk is real­ly about the pol­i­tics of right now. Which means it’s about glob­al social jus­tice, the fail­ures of late cap­i­tal­ism, and the cli­mate cri­sis.

Architectures of Quarantine & Containment

presented by David A. Garcia, Léopold Lambert

One very inter­est­ing addi­tion to the pub­lic space is how we are con­di­tion­ing and defin­ing the pub­lic space with regards to even­tu­al attacks. And it’s chang­ing the land­scape rad­i­cal­ly. And the very first knee-jerk reac­tion was con­crete blocks in front of many insti­tu­tions. Now they’re try­ing to design these con­crete blocks so they seem some­thing which is part of the land­scape but the pres­ence and the robust­ness is still so vio­lent that it’s hard to hide the inten­tion.

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