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Geek of the Week: Marshall T. Rose

In the past you saw inter­na­tion­al and nation­al stan­dard­iza­tion of very well‐defined tech­nolo­gies. For exam­ple, if you were going to build nuts and bolts, what the threads look like, and you know, with the prop­er spac­ing and height and grip and so on. And so you know, this is not rock­et sci­ence. It’s crit­i­cal­ly impor­tant to an engineer’s infra­struc­ture to have stan­dard­iza­tion of these things, but it’s not as if we are try­ing to some­how cod­i­fy the laws of physics.

Geek of the Week: Steve Crocker

The inter­est­ing phe­nom­e­non relat­ed to the RSA algo­rithm and is not shared with some of the oth­er algo­rithms is it is use­ful for both encryp­tion and for dig­i­tal sig­na­ture. That is they are two dis­tinct uses and this sin­gle algo­rithm is use­ful for both of those. And there’s an amaz­ing and some­what inter­est­ing sto­ry that then devel­ops from that.

Geek of the Week: Radia Perlman

The peo­ple that invent­ed Ethernet did a real good thing. Ethernet is good tech­nol­o­gy. But they did a real­ly bad thing because they called it a net. And they shouldn’t have called it Ethernet, they should’ve called it Etherlink.”

Virtual Futures Salon: Beyond Bitcoin, with Vinay Gupta

Blockchain is in that space where we still have to explain it, because most of the peo­ple have gone from not hav­ing it around to hav­ing it around. But for kind of the folks that are your age or a lit­tle younger it’s kind of always been there, at which point it doesn’t real­ly need to be explained. It does how­ev­er need to be con­tex­tu­al­ized.

Virtual Futures Salon: Dawn of the New Everything, with Jaron Lanier

So here’s what hap­pened. If you tell peo­ple you’re going to have this super‐open, absolute­ly non‐commercial, money‐free thing, but it has to sur­vive in this envi­ron­ment that’s based on mon­ey, where it has to make mon­ey, how does any­body square that cir­cle? How does any­body do any­thing? And so com­pa­nies like Google that came along, in my view were backed into a cor­ner. There was exact­ly one busi­ness plan avail­able to them, which was adver­tis­ing.

Steve Crocker’s Internet Hall of Fame 2012 Profile

I’ve been involved with the Internet Society for vir­tu­al­ly its entire life. Years ago, I had the good for­tune to be involved with the ear­ly days of the ARPANET and played a small role in help­ing build some of the tech­nol­o­gy, and in build­ing some of the social struc­tures that brought every­body togeth­er.

Nancy Hafkin’s Internet Hall of Fame 2012 Profile

I think my proud­est achieve­ments were to be able to set up and launch the first pro­gram at the United Nations to pro­mote infor­ma­tion tech­nol­o­gy in a region. And the region was of course Africa.

Lawrence Landweber’s Internet Hall of Fame 2012 Profile

I got involved with net­work­ing some­time in the late 70s, main­ly because I was look­ing around and dis­cov­er­ing that peo­ple were get­ting into net­work­ing, email. And at the time I was depart­ment chair at University of Wisconsin, the com­put­er sci­ence depart­ment, and was try­ing to under­stand what those capa­bil­i­ties would do for our fac­ul­ty and stu­dents.

Elizabeth Feinler’s Internet Hall of Fame 2012 Profile

I’m Elizabeth Feinler, usu­al­ly known as Jake.” That’s my nick­name. And I ran the con­tract for the Network Information Center on both the ARPANET and the Defense Data Network back in the 70s and 80s.

Mitchell Baker’s Internet Hall of Fame 2012 Induction Speech

The thing that always amazed me about [the Internet] is that it was just there. It wasn’t a giant announce­ment. It wasn’t a per­son. It wasn’t an orga­ni­za­tion. It was just there.

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