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What Can a Body Do? How We Meet the Built World

In ten years of doing research and col­lab­o­ra­tions and being men­tored, I’ve learned to see dis­abled peo­ple as doing the most cre­ative work that is also the most urgent work of body meet­ing world. And I think it’s real­ly crit­i­cal to keep both of these things close­ly togeth­er.

The Domains of Identity & Self-Sovereign Identity

Self-sovereign iden­ti­ty is what sits in the mid­dle enabling indi­vid­u­als to man­age all these dif­fer­ent rela­tion­ships in a way that is sig­nif­i­cant­ly less com­plex than each of those insti­tu­tions need­ing to have a busi­ness rela­tion­ship with each oth­er to see those cre­den­tials.

What Do Community and the Social Landscape Look Like in Space?

Community is always part of a sys­tem that we some­times can or can­not see or rec­og­nize. And in Gerard O’Neill’s pro­pos­als for these islands in space, those communities…were sup­posed to per­form a very spe­cif­ic func­tion in a larg­er sys­tem. They were sup­posed to be exper­i­ments.

Law & Order, or Game of Thrones? The Legal Landscape of Space Exploration

I per­son­al­ly am not wor­ried about set­tle­ments. I think they’re so far in the future that we can’t pre­dict what they’ll look like. We can’t even keep human beings, par­tic­u­lar­ly a lot of human beings, alive in space or have real set­tle­ments, the way we envi­sion a colony or a set­tle­ment. I don’t think the lack of sov­er­eign­ty is going to hurt any of this.

What Could be Unsettling about New Settlements?

I think we’re already mov­ing into a very—uncom­fort­ably for most of us, into a place where nation-states, gov­ern­ments, are being forced to cede author­i­ty to cor­po­ra­tions. And that is going to, I assume, hap­pen faster and faster. And if you throw in space, if you throw in the lim­it­less­ness of space, then I mean…the sky’s the lim­it so to speak. I don’t know what the…where that takes us.

What Sci-Fi Futures Can (and Can’t) Teach Us About AI Policy, open­ing and clos­ing com­ments

AI Policy Futures is a research effort to explore the rela­tion­ship between sci­ence fic­tion around AI and the social imag­i­nar­ies of AI. What those social mea­sures can teach us about real tech­nol­o­gy pol­i­cy today. We seem to tell the same few sto­ries about AI, and they’re not very help­ful.

Bridging AI Fact and Fiction

This is going to be a con­ver­sa­tion about sci­ence fic­tion not just as a cul­tur­al phe­nom­e­non, or a body of work of dif­fer­ent kinds, but also as a kind of method or a tool.

Untold AI — What AI Stories Should We Be Telling Ourselves?

How peo­ple think about AI depends large­ly on how they know AI. And to the point, how the most peo­ple know AI is through sci­ence fic­tion, which sort of rais­es the ques­tion, yeah? What sto­ries are we telling our­selves about AI in sci­ence fic­tion?

How Sci-Fi Reflects Our AI Hopes and Fears

We came up with the idea to write a short paper…trying to make some sense of those many nar­ra­tives that we have around arti­fi­cial intel­li­gence and see if we could divide them up into dif­fer­ent hopes and dif­fer­ent fears.

AI in Reality

When data sci­en­tists talk about bias, we talk about quan­tifi­able bias that is a result of let’s say incom­plete or incor­rect data. And data sci­en­tists love liv­ing in that world—it’s very com­fort­able. Why? Because once it’s quan­ti­fied if you can point out the error you just fix the error. What this does not ask is should you have built the facial recog­ni­tion tech­nol­o­gy in the first place?

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