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2013 Internet Hall of Fame Inductee Interviews: Ram Mohan

keep­ing cohe­sion at the core of the Internet is an impor­tant thing. I’m not wor­ried that that’s going to go away. But you have to con­tin­u­al­ly pay atten­tion to it. Because that func­tion of con­verg­ing, at the core is a crit­i­cal one. When you do that well, what it allows is at the edges of the Internet it allows for things to hap­pen. For inno­va­tion, for ideas to happen.

2013 Internet Hall of Fame Inductee Interviews: Ralph Droms

We’re at a time of huge expan­sion of the Internet out­side of the kinds of Internet con­nec­tions and devices that we’re famil­iar with. We’ve seen some of that over the past few years as we’ve moved from lap­tops, desk­top com­put­ers, to smart­phones and tablets and we’ve seen a big increase. Right now instead of a tablet and a lap­top at home, you’ve got a tablet, two iPhones, and a desk­top computer. 

2013 Internet Hall of Fame Inductee Interviews: Tracy Licklider

I think he would to some extent be sur­prised that busi­ness has hijacked the Internet in a cer­tain sense. That the enter­tain­ment industry…I’ll just pick on them but oth­er indus­tries too, that’ve basi­cal­ly exploit­ed that sort of deliv­ery vehi­cle that was made not real­ly with them in mind but they have gained such a dom­i­nant posi­tion in dic­tat­ing how and where the Internet goes. 

2013 Internet Hall of Fame Inductee Interviews: Glenn Ricart

In some ways, I helped put the inter” into the the Internet because it was the first time these administratively-different net­works were con­nect­ed togeth­er and could con­nect togeth­er as they wished. 

2013 Internet Hall of Fame Inductee Interviews: Gihan Dias

There’s lots of fears. So one major fear would be pri­va­cy. So pri­va­cy is some­thing which we used to take for grant­ed. Now we can­not. The oth­er major fear I have is centralization.

2013 Internet Hall of Fame Inductee Interviews: George Sadowsky

I would hope that ten or twen­ty years from now we live in a world in which Internet access is tak­en almost for grant­ed, and that it’s con­ceiv­able that the Internet—the name Internet”—will actu­al­ly fade and we’ll just con­sid­er it part of the infra­struc­ture that we’re used to just like you know, there’ll be a plug in the wall for infor­ma­tion ser­vices over the Internet.

2013 Internet Hall of Fame Inductee Interviews: François Flückiger

The main fear I have, and I believe most of my col­leagues have, is to see the Internet more frag­ment­ed than it is, and much more frag­ment­ed than we want­ed it to be. When we designed it, we devel­oped tech­nol­o­gy which was due to be open, which means that every­one knows the tech­nol­o­gy, every­one can devel­op it, and every­one can improve it as well. 

David Clark’s Internet Hall of Fame 2013 Induction Speech

The future of the Internet today is not defined by tech­nol­o­gists, it is defined by the rich inter­play between tech­nol­o­gy and the larg­er con­text of eco­nom­ic invest­ment, reg­u­la­to­ry the­o­ry, social, cul­tur­al, and polit­i­cal con­cerns. It’s a chal­lenge for the tech­ni­cal com­mu­ni­ty to under­stand these larg­er factors.

The Ideas of John Perry Barlow in Uncertain Times

If you’re look­ing to the ques­tion how can the whole thing be reg­u­lat­ed, how can one get con­trol of this whole envi­ron­ment, so as to cre­ate a world in which those orig­i­nal free­doms that Barlow was talk­ing about are shared by every­one, the answer is you can’t do it.

The Real Name Game

Citizenship, after not think­ing about it for a while, feels like some­thing we’re all think­ing about quite a lot these days. In the words of Hannah Arendt, cit­i­zen­ship is the right to have rights. All of your rights essen­tial­ly descend from your cit­i­zen­ship, because only coun­tries will pro­tect those rights.

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