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Beyond Biocentricity in Design & Pedagogy

Today, we will exam­ine the his­tor­i­cal and philo­soph­i­cal roots of bio­cen­trism, bio­mimicry, explore the qual­i­ty of the rela­tion­ship it pre­sup­pos­es with nature, and ques­tion its ecofriend­li­ness. We will intro­duce emerg­ing alter­na­tives to bio­mimicry and dis­cuss the chal­lenges it promis­es.

Design Justice for the Green New Deal

What I want to share is one way of think­ing about how we’re going to design and build the tech­nolo­gies and the sociotech­ni­cal sys­tems that we need for a Green New Deal, if such a thing is what we do want to build. And what that could look like through the lens of this com­mu­ni­ty of prac­ti­tion­ers that I’m part of, which is the Design Justice Network.

Labor, Architecture and the Green New Deal

The main thing that we need to be doing is work­ing as a dis­ci­pline, as a pro­fes­sion, as a uni­fied voice, so that we sit at the table of pol­i­cy­mak­ing and are believed as not just ambulance-chasers for work for our­selves but as peo­ple with knowl­edge and what­ev­er embed­ded­ness in the com­mu­ni­ty, and our design exper­tise with­in the com­mu­ni­ty is absolute­ly essen­tial.

Design and the Green New Deal

I think that Damian asked me here in large part to talk about this essay from last spring in Places Journal that begins pret­ty timid­ly with this line, I don’t know when the myth of design­ers as cli­mate sav­iors began, but I know that it’s time to kill it. Which as you can imag­ine got me invit­ed to lots of din­ner par­ties at Harvard.

Empathy Reifies Disability Stigmas

I think we need to start think­ing crit­i­cal­ly about things that we per­ceive as whole­some. Empathy has become a big busi­ness, and we ought to be able to exam­ine it. Everyone’s always try­ing to diag­nose dis­abled peo­ple. But I’m gonna have a lit­tle bit of fun. And I’m actu­al­ly gonna diag­nose all of you.

Designing for Data Literacy in the Age of Post-Truth

We should use our tool­box to make com­plex­i­ty under­stand­able. We need to use the tools at our dis­pos­al to build data lit­er­a­cy by show­ing the con­text that data exists in. Because with that data, and with con­text around the data, we’ll be able to build under­stand­ing…

ASU KEDtalks: Democratizing Digital Design

Rather than begrudg­ing­ly push­ing soci­ety for­ward to be ready, I ask design­ers to crit­i­cal­ly reflect on the lim­i­ta­tions of their own design prac­tices and to remem­ber that to design for one inter­sec­tion of society—namely, afflu­ent middle-to-upper-class white American men—does not mean that those designs will work for those who do not iden­ti­fy as such. Even with mod­i­fi­ca­tions.

Visions of Digital Creativity: Organic Design

I’m here to talk about dig­i­tal cul­ture, but a strange, very inter­est­ing aspect of it: how close it has brought us to nature. How much it has brought us clos­er to the dream, to the Holy Grail of all design­ers and archi­tects and engi­neers and you name it, to do it like nature does because nature does it best.

The City as an Individual Organism

In the begin­ning, I thought that the goal would’ve been to focus on col­lec­tive hap­pi­ness. But what I found was you can actu­al­ly give some­one every­thing that you would think that they need to be hap­py and they’ll find ways to be unhap­py.

More-Than-Human Centred Design

I think it’s impor­tant to say that one thing about our work is that we are not fix­at­ed on the future as a strict lin­ear pro­gres­sion. We start by acknowl­edg­ing the fact that the future is not a fixed des­ti­na­tion but a constantly-shifting and unfold­ing space of diverse poten­tial.

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