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Cory Booker’s Advice for the Next President

We have a tax sys­tem right now that cre­ates a lot of per­verse incen­tives. It incen­tivizes jobs mov­ing over­seas, incen­tivizes a lack of invest­ment here at home, the­se inver­sions that are hap­pen­ing. And I do believe that when it comes to pay­ing fair tax­es, there’s a lot of folks who are pay­ing large per­cent­ages of their incom­ing tax­es, but that’s not reflect­ed in oth­er asset brack­ets.

Campbell Brown’s Advice for the Next President

Two out of three 8th graders in this coun­try can­not read or do math at grade lev­el. We are not prepar­ing our kids for what the future holds.

Anne-Marie Slaughter’s Advice for the Next President

Asking any author about a book the President should read imme­di­ate­ly makes me think, Mine, of course.” But what I would actu­al­ly say is the next pres­i­dent should be Jamie Merisotis’ America Needs Talent.

What Will Cybersecurity Look Like in the Next Decade?

Sure, cyber­space is about peo­ple and data. But it is also about appli­ca­tions. And devices. And the indi­rect and non-obvious rela­tion­ships between all of this. It cre­ates a very com­pli­cat­ed and excit­ing ecosys­tem. One that is capa­ble of dra­mat­ic inno­va­tion, and dra­mat­ic exploita­tion.

The Next Social Contract Opening Keynote: Senator Elizabeth Warren

Just as this coun­try did a hun­dred years ago, it’s time to rethink the basic bar­gain between work­ers and com­pa­nies. As greater wealth is gen­er­at­ed by new tech­nol­o­gy, how can we ensure that the work­ers who sup­port the econ­o­my can actu­al­ly share in the wealth?

Improving the Next #EdTechContract Through Open Educational Resources

When you think about the Internet is, the Internet is real­ly a giant shar­ing machine. It’s a machine for mak­ing copies, for mak­ing deriv­a­tive works, for mak­ing remix­es and mak­ing mashups. For dis­trib­ut­ing those around the world instan­ta­neous­ly. And so there’s a very pro­found ten­sion between what copy­right enables legal­ly, and what the Internet enables tech­ni­cal­ly.

Equitable Internet Access Must Be Part of the Next #EdTechContract

The peo­ple who expe­ri­ence broad­er and more per­va­sive forms of social inequal­i­ty relat­ed to hous­ing, edu­ca­tion, lan­guage pro­fi­cien­cy, occu­pa­tion­al oppor­tu­ni­ty and so forth, are also the ones who are most like­ly to be under-connected to the Internet.

What Our Algorithms Will Know in 2100

A lot of the sci­ence fic­tion I love the most is not about the­se big ques­tions. You read a book like The Diamond Age and the most inter­est­ing thing in The Diamond Age is the medi­a­tron­ic chop­sticks, the small detail that Stephenson says okay, well if you have nan­otech­nol­o­gy, peo­ple are going to use this tech­nol­o­gy in the most pedes­tri­an, kind of ordi­nary ways.

What Do Algorithms Know?

The Tyranny of Algorithms is obvi­ous­ly a polem­i­cal title to start a con­ver­sa­tion around com­pu­ta­tion and cul­ture. But I think that it helps us get into the cul­tur­al, the polit­i­cal, the legal, the eth­i­cal dimen­sions of code. Because we so often think of code, and code is so often con­struct­ed, in a pure­ly tech­ni­cal frame­work, by peo­ple who see them­selves as solv­ing tech­ni­cal prob­lems.

Who’s Killing Crypto?

Encryption is a key piece of a robust enter­prise approach to cyber­se­cu­ri­ty. It keeps down the num­ber of data breach­es as the scale and the size of data breach­es con­tin­ues only to grow. It also is the first line of defense that users have again­st peo­ple access­ing their data on an indi­vid­u­al lev­el.

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