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Lawrence Landweber’s Internet Hall of Fame 2012 Profile

I got involved with net­work­ing some­time in the late 70s, main­ly because I was look­ing around and dis­cov­er­ing that peo­ple were get­ting into net­work­ing, email. And at the time I was depart­ment chair at University of Wisconsin, the com­put­er sci­ence depart­ment, and was try­ing to under­stand what those capa­bil­i­ties would do for our fac­ul­ty and stu­dents.

Elizabeth Feinler’s Internet Hall of Fame 2012 Profile

I’m Elizabeth Feinler, usu­al­ly known as Jake.” That’s my nick­name. And I ran the con­tract for the Network Information Center on both the ARPANET and the Defense Data Network back in the 70s and 80s.

Mitchell Baker’s Internet Hall of Fame 2012 Induction Speech

The thing that always amazed me about [the Internet] is that it was just there. It wasn’t a giant announce­ment. It wasn’t a per­son. It wasn’t an orga­ni­za­tion. It was just there.

Vint Cerf’s Internet Hall of Fame 2012 Induction Speech

You know, I got to think­ing about—Tan Tin Wee beat me to this anal­o­gy but I’m going to use it any­way. If the ARPANET cre­at­ed atoms, then the Internet cre­at­ed mol­e­cules. And Tim Berners-Lee cre­at­ed DNA. And after that, it was just life in all its vari­a­tions. So now I final­ly fig­ured out, what is it that …read the full tran­script.

Vint Cerf Areté Medallion Q&A Elon University 2016

We’ve already been through sev­er­al sit­u­a­tions where new tech­nolo­gies come along. The Industrial Revolution removed a large num­ber of jobs that had been done by hand, replaced them with machines. But the machines had to be built, the machines had to be oper­at­ed, the machines had to be main­tained. And the same is true in this online envi­ron­ment.

Tim Berners-Lee Announces the World Wide Web Foundation

I wrote a memo say­ing, We should have a glob­al hyper­text sys­tem to fix this.” The memo, I dis­trib­uted it to a few peo­ple but there’s nowhere real­ly to dis­trib­ute it to at CERN because CERN is a physics lab. It didn’t have com­mit­tees for build­ing pro­grams and hyper­text sys­tems.

So what hap­pened was basi­cal­ly noth­ing for eigh­teen months.

What Does the Internet Bring to the Concept of a Country?

You all have, undoubt­ed­ly, friends in New York and San Francisco and Berlin and Tokyo and Australia or what­ev­er, all of whom you have much more in com­mon with than you do with your neigh­bor. You’ve cre­at­ed dias­po­ras of inter­est. The death of dis­tance has cre­at­ed many dif­fer­ent new forms of coun­try. Countries which aren’t based on how far it is from us to those guys over there, but new coun­tries based on what you’re inter­est­ed in.

Four Trends for the Digital World

This quote’s from Andy Warhol. He was look­ing at America and say­ing America’s dif­fer­ent. He’s say­ing, Well, Elizabeth Taylor’s drink­ing Coke and I’m drink­ing Coke and the bum on the street’s drink­ing Coke, and it’s all the same thing.” For the first time in his­to­ry, mass mar­ket cul­ture has allowed us all to enjoy the same thing. This is not cham­pagne. The bum on the street can’t afford cham­pagne.

Brewster Kahle at Aaron Swartz Day 2015

I’d sug­gest it’s time to fix the World Wide Web […] and I’m going to sug­gest the way to do this is by build­ing a dis­trib­uted Web. This is a call to build a dis­trib­uted Web, to lock the Web open.

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