IxDA (Page 1 of 2)

Apocalypse!!!!! How Not to be An Idiot Designing Climate Futures

presented by Juli Sikorska

We real­ly seem to indulge in dystopi­an think­ing. And we love it. And I real­ly won­der why that hap­pens. I don’t know how you feel about this, but it real­ly stress­es me out. And it kind of both­ers me that it’s still a lot of times eas­i­er to imag­ine the end of the world than how we could live on a sus­tain­able plan­et.

Computer, Stop
Why Star Trek only goes so far and we need to try harder than science fiction

presented by Dan Hon

Star Trek’s vision of a voice inter­face to com­put­ing was and remains incred­i­bly com­pelling. So much to the extent that about three years ago, Amazon includ­ed Computer” as a wake word to the Echo so that we can pre­tend to talk to the first mass-market voice assis­tant as if we’re on a space­ship in the 24th cen­tu­ry.

Austerity as a Service
Human-Centered Design for Climate Mitigation and Resilience

presented by Scott Sullivan

As a human-centered design­er what is my role, what is our role, in this kind of big­ger pic­ture? If this is the dom­i­nant lens of soci­ety, what’s our con­tri­bu­tion?

In Praise of Discomfort

presented by Marie Jasmin

For an expe­ri­ence to be mem­o­rable let alone trans­for­ma­tive, the human brain has to be pushed out of default auto-pilot mode into con­scious thought. And that push nec­es­sar­i­ly involves some lev­el of dis­com­fort.

(Data) Trust is the New Oil
Redesigning the data economy to optimize for trust

presented by Andrew Hoppin

The pow­er of data has nev­er been big­ger than it is today and I think this can be a great thing, even though it is also cre­at­ing some exis­ten­tial risks.

Empathy Reifies Disability Stigmas

presented by Liz Jackson

I think we need to start think­ing crit­i­cal­ly about things that we per­ceive as whole­some. Empathy has become a big busi­ness, and we ought to be able to exam­ine it. Everyone’s always try­ing to diag­nose dis­abled peo­ple. But I’m gonna have a lit­tle bit of fun. And I’m actu­al­ly gonna diag­nose all of you.

Designing for Data Literacy in the Age of Post-Truth

presented by Holger Kuehnle

We should use our tool­box to make com­plex­i­ty under­stand­able. We need to use the tools at our dis­pos­al to build data lit­er­a­cy by show­ing the con­text that data exists in. Because with that data, and with con­text around the data, we’ll be able to build under­stand­ing…

More-Than-Human Centred Design

presented by Anab Jain

I think it’s impor­tant to say that one thing about our work is that we are not fix­at­ed on the future as a strict lin­ear pro­gres­sion. We start by acknowl­edg­ing the fact that the future is not a fixed des­ti­na­tion but a constantly-shifting and unfold­ing space of diverse poten­tial.

What We Really Mean When We Say Ethics”

presented by Molly Wright Steenson

The Markkula Center for Applied Ethics at Santa Clara University has some real­ly use­ful think­ing and cur­ric­u­la around ethics. One of the things they point out is that what ethics is not is eas­i­er to talk about than what ethics actu­al­ly is. And some of the things that they say about what ethics is not include feel­ings. Those aren’t ethics. And reli­gion isn’t ethics. Also law. That’s not ethics. Science isn’t ethics.

The Oppenheimer Moment

presented by Alan Cooper

Where did this evil stuff come from? Are we evil? I’m per­fect­ly will­ing to stip­u­late you are not evil. Neither is your boss evil. Nor is Larry Page or Mark Zuckerberg or Bill Gates. And yet the results of our work, our best most altru­is­tic work, often turns evil when it’s deployed in the larg­er world. We go to work every day, gen­uine­ly expect­ing to make the world a bet­ter place with our pow­er­ful tech­nol­o­gy. But some­how, evil is sneak­ing in despite our good inten­tions.

Page 1 of 2