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Apocalypse!!!!! How Not to be An Idiot Designing Climate Futures

We real­ly seem to indulge in dystopi­an think­ing. And we love it. And I real­ly won­der why that hap­pens. I don’t know how you feel about this, but it real­ly stress­es me out. And it kind of both­ers me that it’s still a lot of times eas­i­er to imag­ine the end of the world than how we could live on a sus­tain­able plan­et.

Austerity as a Service
Human-Centered Design for Climate Mitigation and Resilience

As a human-centered design­er what is my role, what is our role, in this kind of big­ger pic­ture? If this is the dom­i­nant lens of soci­ety, what’s our con­tri­bu­tion?

Planning the Green New Deal
Climate Justice and the Politics of Sites and Scales

The urgency of cli­mate change and the rise of a grass­roots leg­isla­tive polit­i­cal envi­ron­men­tal move­ment in the United States should change the way urban plan­ners think and act on spa­tial change and social jus­tice.

Projecting Change
Extended Realities & Sea Level Rise

Projecting Change was part our post-professional MA in Adaptive Reuse pro­gram. It was inspired by the effects of Hurricane Sandy, which turned Newport, Rhode Island into a lake.

Solarpunk : A Grand Dress Rehearsal

Many of the con­cerns of the cyber­punk genre have come true. The rise of cor­po­rate pow­er, ubiq­ui­tous com­pu­ta­tion, and the like. Robot limbs and cool VR gog­gles. But in many ways, it’s far far worse.

Deep Sensing

When we think about short-term think­ing, how short-term is short-term? Because if you plant a tree, like an oak tree, it takes 100 to 120 years for an oak tree to be ful­ly grown. So any­thing between the point in which you plant the tree to when the tree is ful­ly grown is short-term think­ing, when we speak about land.

ASU KEDtalks: Designing Earth’s Future

Geologists are try­ing to rec­og­nize the mag­ni­tude of this change by giv­ing our epoch a spe­cial name: the Anthropocene,” the age of humans. Some peo­ple find this depress­ing because they think that the Anthropocene is inevitably a bad thing. But it’s not. Because we aren’t bac­te­ria. Those brains that give us the abil­i­ty to har­ness ener­gy also give us the abil­i­ty to shape the way the plan­et is trans­formed. We can design our future.

ASU KEDtalks: Water, a Pricing Paradox

Water is a dif­fi­cult com­mod­i­ty. It is free, and yet cost­ly. It is simul­ta­ne­ous­ly a pri­vate good, and a pub­lic good. It helps cities flour­ish finan­cial­ly, but now it is their finan­cial bur­den. Almost nobody pays for the water per se. The cost of water is the cost of mak­ing it avail­able at the right time, in the right place, and with the right qual­i­ty.

Liberalism in the Anthropocene

This emerg­ing nar­ra­tive of cat­a­stro­phe is putting enor­mous pres­sure on all our polit­i­cal beliefs. Now there’s still some con­ser­v­a­tive par­ties, some US Republicans for exam­ple, who deny the basic facts, but we can be pret­ty sure I think that any pol­i­tics that denies the facts does­n’t have much of a future.

How Should We Do Politics?

I think that pol­i­tics has always been sus­cep­ti­ble to con­ver­sion so that it’s not actu­al­ly about liv­ing peo­ple it’s about sig­nal­ing mem­ber­ship with­in a par­tic­u­lar com­mu­ni­ty.

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