Archive (Page 2 of 2)

Biased Data Panel Discussion

I think that we need a rad­i­cal design change. And I might ask if I were teach­ing an HCI class or design class with you, I would say, How are you going to design this so that not one life is lost?” What if that were the design imper­a­tive rather than what’s your IPO going to be?

Everybody Knows When You’re Talking To Your Mother

You have to think with your users, with your cus­tomers, what is your actu­al rela­tion­ship? Are they your gods? Are they your guests? Are they a nui­sance to you? Because you know where the pow­er is.

The Computer as Extended Phenotype

The com­put­er is being used for so many things that I claim that we have to con­sid­er the com­put­er as part of our extend­ed phe­no­type. It’s just a part of a thing that has evolved with us using memes.

Khaleeji Design: An Imported Aesthetic?

If you are giv­en the task to lec­ture on design some­where in the Middle East, do you think you’ll need to tai­lor your approach? Maybe think about your ref­er­ences, the lan­guage, the vast­ly dif­fer­ent back­ground? The answer most prob­a­bly is yes.” But the real­i­ty of design edu­ca­tion in the Middle East, and more specif­i­cal­ly the Gulf Region, prove oth­er­wise.

Wrapping Sentences Around Things

So that’s what we’re try­ing to do, I think, we devo­tees who write about the designed and pen-outlined world. We’re just wrapper-uppers at Crate and Barrel. We’re pack­agers, tem­po­rary pack­agers. And our cho­sen pack­ing medium—sentences, paragraphs—sometimes obscures as much as much as it helps us see.

Photo of Ian Bogost during presentation,with a slide displaying the word "Fun" in large letters.

Fun

What if we arrive at fun not through expand­ing the cir­cum­stances that we’re in in order to make them less wretched, but actu­al­ly by embrac­ing the wretched­ness of the cir­cum­stances them­selves? What if, in a lit­er­al way, fun comes from impov­er­ish­ment, from wretched­ness?

Exploring (Semantic) Space With (Literal) Robots

I’ve made it my goal as a com­put­er poet not to imi­tate exist­ing poet­ry but to find new ways for poet­ry to exist. So what I’m going to do in this talk is take this metaphor of explor­ing lit­er­a­ture to its log­i­cal con­clu­sion.

Slow Rebellion

If we think that the rebel­lion changes the world, does it real­ly mat­ter what the time scale is? It does­n’t have to be an overnight over­throw. It can be the steady remak­ing of the world through pure force of con­vic­tion, like water wear­ing away stone. We have slow food, we have slow fash­ion, why can’t we have slow rebel­lion?

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