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Fascism and Faux-pen Source

I’m going to teach you how to run your open source project in a fas­cist style. So friends, Ruby pro­gram­mers, lis­ten up. I dis­cov­ered a rev­o­lu­tion, a rev­o­lu­tion in mar­ket­ing open source. A rev­o­lu­tion in mar­ket­ing social media mar­ket­ing. A rev­o­lu­tion in pro­mo­tion bet­ter than guy-liner. A rev­o­lu­tion in you. It will change your life. It will change everyone’s life. The rev­o­lu­tion­ary tech­nique is fas­cist pro­pa­gan­da.

Programming is Forgetting: Toward a New Hacker Ethic

I wouldn’t be sur­prised to find out that many of us here today like to see our work as a con­tin­u­a­tion of say the Tech Model Railroad Club or the Homebrew Computer Club, and cer­tain­ly the ter­mi­nol­o­gy and the val­ues of this con­fer­ence, like open source for exam­ple, have their roots in that era. As a con­se­quence it’s easy to inter­pret any crit­i­cism of the hack­er ethic—which is what I’m about to do—as a kind of assault.

What Should We Know About Algorithms?

When I go talk about this, the thing that I tell peo­ple is that I’m not wor­ried about algo­rithms tak­ing over human­i­ty, because they kind of suck at a lot of things, right. And we’re real­ly not that good at a lot of things we do. But there are things that we’re good at. And so the exam­ple that I like to give is Amazon rec­om­mender sys­tems. You all run into this on Netflix or Amazon, where they rec­om­mend stuff to you. And those algo­rithms are actu­al­ly very sim­i­lar to a lot of the sophis­ti­cat­ed arti­fi­cial intel­li­gence we see now. It’s the same under­neath.

Bots and the Rise of Digital Folk Art

I’m inter­est­ed in what hap­pens when artists who are used to being artists decide that the best place for a work is with­in a space that seems to require an entire­ly dif­fer­ent method of con­struc­tion. And of course, there’s no harsh line between forms, and plen­ty of peo­ple exist both as highly-proficient work­ing artists and excep­tion­al­ly skilled pro­gram­mers. Tons of them, right? But I’m not talk­ing so much about the skill or even back­ground. Instead of I’m inter­est­ed in men­tal­i­ty.

Verifying and Validating Machine Intelligence

We’ve been build­ing autonomous vehi­cles for about twenty-five years, and now that the tech­nol­o­gy has become adopt­ed much more broad­ly and is on the brink of being deployed, our earnest fac­ul­ty who’ve been look­ing at it are now real­ly inter­est­ed in ques­tions like, a car sud­den­ly real­izes an emer­gen­cy, an ani­mal has just jumped out at it. There’s going to be a crash in one sec­ond from now. Human ner­vous sys­tem can’t deal with that fast enough. What should the car do?

Working on ENIAC: The Lost Labors of the Information Age

The largest part of the ENIAC team by far were the peo­ple that were actu­ally build­ing the thing. And it’s inter­est­ing they’ve been for­got­ten by his­tory, because although their job titles were wire­men, tech­ni­cians, and assem­blers, being a busi­ness his­to­rian I looked up the account­ing records, and some­times they spell out the pay­roll. You sud­denly see all the­se women’s names like Ruth, Jane, Alice, Dorothy, Caroline, Eleanor show­ing up.

Kay Mauchly on Finding Out about ENIAC, Programming It, and Marrying John Mauchly

Then we were told we had to learn how to oper­ate this machine. Well, how do you go about that? And some­body from Moore School gave us a whole stack of blue­prints, and the­se were the wiring dia­grams for all the pan­els. And they said, Here, you can fig­ure out how the machine works and then fig­ure out how to pro­gram it.”

Nettrice Gaskins on Techno-Vernacular Creativity and STEAM

I think the part that engages stu­dents that are from under­rep­re­sent­ed eth­nic groups is miss­ing. I think they don’t see them­selves reflect­ed, don’t see their inter­ests or their cul­tures reflect­ed, so they stay out­side of it even if it’s free, or even if it’s some­thing that is in their neigh­bor­hood.

The Computer as Extended Phenotype

The com­put­er is being used for so many things that I claim that we have to con­sid­er the com­put­er as part of our extend­ed phe­no­type. It’s just a part of a thing that has evolved with us using memes.

Fran Allen Keynote, Grace Hopper Celebration 2008

What I believe is that com­put­er sci­ence emerged as a sci­ence, as a pro­fes­sion, with all the require­ments on what pro­fes­sion­al stan­dards and require­ments of what one need­ed to know to get a job in the field. […] In that peri­od, then, cre­den­tials were estab­lished, and by the ear­ly 70s things had real­ly changed for wom­en, at least in my envi­ron­ment, and most oth­er groups that I’ve talked to about this the­o­ry absolute­ly agree that that was where there was a sig­nif­i­cant shift.

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