Archive

Disposable Life: Carol Gluck

I’ve been think­ing about dis­pos­able life and the mean­ing that might have in soci­eties today. And I decid­ed that the the kind of dis­pos­able life that most con­cerns me is the kind that we either res­olute­ly don’t see, ignore, or neglect. Or the kind that we do see but can’t seem to deal with.

Solving the Economic Generation Gap

I want­ed to start off this morn­ing using an American poet and nov­el­ist, Langston Hughes. And I quote him to have said, What hap­pens to a dream deferred?” It is a ques­tion now fac­ing mil­lions all over the world, espe­cial­ly young peo­ple. Why? Because of pover­ty. Because of exces­sive inequal­i­ty

Welcome to the Entreprecariat — Disrupting Precarization

The rec­i­p­ro­cal influ­ence between an entre­pre­neuri­al­ist regime and per­va­sive pre­car­i­ty, their ambiva­lent coex­is­tence, is what the con­cept of the entrep­re­cari­at refers to. To artic­u­late some of the ways in which this mutu­al influ­ence takes place, I’d like to intro­duce what I would call a pos­tu­late of the entrep­re­cari­at. So here it is: The more pre­car­i­ty is present, the less entre­pre­neuri­al­ism is vol­un­tary.

Bad Nomadism

Sketching the talk out last night, I decid­ed […] to sum­ma­rize briefly, reflect­ing back on every­thing that I’ve built recent­ly. It can kind of be sum­ma­rized as the infra­struc­ture by which I (and oth­ers) wish to live doesn’t exist; so we’ve no choice but to build it our­selves.” I kind of describe this and a lot of the oth­er things I do at this present moment as being the soft end of stack­tivism.