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Evgeny Morozov Keynote at Internetdagarna 2015

If you look at the appeal that Silicon Valley has to a lot of us, and to a lot of pub­lic insti­tu­tions espe­cial­ly, I think you can under­stand that the rea­son for that appeal is very sim­ple. They can offer ser­vices that work, that work in a very effec­tive man­ner, and that are offered more or less either very cheap or are most­ly offered for free.

Geek of the Week: Brewster Kahle

We’re at a thou­sand dol­lars per giga­byte, which is what cur­rent disk dri­ves cost. The twen­ty ter­abytes that peo­ple esti­mate in ASCII that’s in the Library of Congress is just twen­ty mil­lion dol­lars. So that’s not very much mon­ey in terms of being able to store and retrieve [crosstalk] the Library of Congress.

Getting Vinyl in Kenyan Basements to Collectors Globally

I’m going to take you through a project that I start­ed back home in Kenya that aims to col­lect vinyl that peo­ple just have chill­ing around at home. Basically we used to have the only press­ing plant in East Africa between 1976 and 1990, and we used to press about a hun­dred and thir­ty thou­sand LPs every year. But right now there are lots of peo­ple who have those, but they’re not doing any­thing with them. 

Traditional Knowledge and Copyright: the Implications for Digitising Pacific Island Cultural Heritage Collections

So what would this mean for those with an inter­est in dig­i­ti­za­tion? Despite being a new legal frame­work, the pro­pos­al may lead to some famil­iar prob­lems for cul­tur­al her­itage insti­tu­tions. Many of you are aware of the prob­lem of orphan works in copy­right. This is where the own­er of a pro­tect­ed work is uniden­ti­fi­able or uncon­tactable, and because they can’t be found it fol­lows that they can’t grant per­mis­sion to oth­ers to copy their work.

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