Archive (Page 2 of 3)

Making/Meaning in the Realm of Anti-Disciplinarity

What does it mean to be antidis­ci­pli­nary? To me, it means strug­gle. Sometimes, work­ing in inter­dis­ci­pli­nary fields, I felt like I’ve may­be tried real­ly hard work­ing and work­ing and work­ing on a project, and I wasn’t see­ing any dif­fer­ence. Sometimes peo­ple would look at me and be like, What are you even doing?” So, to me antidis­ci­pli­nar­i­ty means not only not work­ing in one speci­fic field, but rather instead draw­ing from else­where to imag­ine some­thing new.

Uncreative Writing

With the rise of the Web, writ­ing has met its pho­tog­ra­phy. And by that I mean writ­ing has encoun­tered a sit­u­a­tion sim­i­lar to what hap­pened uh, to paint­ing with the inven­tion of pho­tog­ra­phy. A tech­nol­o­gy so much bet­ter at repli­cat­ing real­i­ty that in order to sur­vive, paint­ing had to ors— or, uh, alter its course rad­i­cal­ly.

1983: A Blackened Window on the World

Rammellzee […] con­sid­ered graf­fi­ti as virus­es. And what he liked to do was to con­nect his pro­duc­tion to mil­i­tary lan­guage. He was say­ing that the graf­fi­ti artists were in a kind of sym­bol­ic cam­paign again­st the stan­dard­iza­tion of the alpha­bet.

Sin in the Time of Technology

Social media com­pa­nies have an unpar­al­leled amount of influ­ence over our mod­ern com­mu­ni­ca­tions. […] These com­pa­nies also play a huge role in shap­ing our glob­al out­look on moral­i­ty and what con­sti­tutes it. So the ways in which we per­ceive dif­fer­ent imagery, dif­fer­ent speech, is being increas­ing­ly defined by the reg­u­la­tions that the­se plat­forms put upon us [in] our dai­ly activ­i­ties on them. 

When Algorithms Fail in Our Personal Lives

I won­der with all the­se vary­ing lev­els of needs that we have as users, and as we live more and more of our lives dig­i­tal­ly and on social media, what would it look like to design a semi-private space in a pub­lic net­work?

Interview with Filip Leu, Tattoo Artist

The main dri­ve we all have is the desire to be tat­tooed. Design comes in sec­ondary, absolute­ly, because there are mul­ti­ple choic­es at every turn that would suit just fine.

Interview with Lal Hardy, Tattoo Artist

The real­i­ty TV shows have been a bless­ing and a hin­drance, I think, to a lot of tat­too artists. The real­i­ty is, real­i­ty shows aren’t real. But they do make peo­ple aware of tat­too­ing.

Interview with Dr Margo DeMello, Cultural Anthropologist

Even if [the media] are going to talk about a fine art show in Paris, they still fall back on those same old phras­es, which is, You’re not going to find sailors here!”

Interview with Paul Sayce, Vice-President, Tattoo Club of Great Britain

I’ve been tat­tooed by mem­bers of my fam­i­ly and peo­ple who’ve nev­er tat­tooed before, because I just want the mark. To me, the tat­too­ing is more of a mark than an actu­al pic­ture.

Interview with Dr. Matt Lodder, Art Historian

Not real­ly many art pro­fes­sion­als, or any art pro­fes­sion­als real­ly, have though through what this might mean for art prac­tice and art the­o­ry. How can we think about tat­too­ing as an art form? If we do think about it as an art form, what are the con­se­quences of that for the ways tat­too­ing is nor­mal­ly under­stood?

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