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Architectural Futures, Public Infrastructure + The Green New Deal pan­el dis­cus­sion

Latour spent his career, or has spent his career argu­ing that sci­en­tif­ic facts need to be seen as a prod­uct of sci­en­tif­ic inquiry. In his terms that they’re net­worked, mean­ing that they stood or fell not on their strength or inher­ent verac­i­ty but on the strength of the insti­tu­tions and prac­tices that pro­duced them. And so, in a pan­el ses­sion that’s dis­cussing archi­tec­tur­al futures, I wan­na ask how we can address roles of our insti­tu­tions and prac­tices in shap­ing these future real­i­ties.

Projecting Change
Extended Realities & Sea Level Rise

Projecting Change was part our post-professional MA in Adaptive Reuse pro­gram. It was inspired by the effects of Hurricane Sandy, which turned Newport, Rhode Island into a lake.

Labor, Architecture and the Green New Deal

The main thing that we need to be doing is work­ing as a dis­ci­pline, as a pro­fes­sion, as a uni­fied voice, so that we sit at the table of pol­i­cy­mak­ing and are believed as not just ambulance-chasers for work for our­selves but as peo­ple with knowl­edge and what­ev­er embed­ded­ness in the com­mu­ni­ty, and our design exper­tise with­in the com­mu­ni­ty is absolute­ly essen­tial.

Design and the Green New Deal

I think that Damian asked me here in large part to talk about this essay from last spring in Places Journal that begins pret­ty timid­ly with this line, I don’t know when the myth of design­ers as cli­mate sav­iors began, but I know that it’s time to kill it. Which as you can imag­ine got me invit­ed to lots of din­ner par­ties at Harvard.

After Comfort

Comfort, like cap­i­tal, is uneven­ly distributed—not every­one gets to have the same amount. When you have it, it’s hard to let go. It’s even hard­er to con­vince some­one to give it up—and I think this is a major chal­lenge we’re fac­ing. Comfort feels nor­mal, expect­ed, obvious—deserved.

Architectures of Quarantine & Containment

One very inter­est­ing addi­tion to the pub­lic space is how we are con­di­tion­ing and defin­ing the pub­lic space with regards to even­tu­al attacks. And it’s chang­ing the land­scape rad­i­cal­ly. And the very first knee-jerk reac­tion was con­crete blocks in front of many insti­tu­tions. Now they’re try­ing to design these con­crete blocks so they seem some­thing which is part of the land­scape but the pres­ence and the robust­ness is still so vio­lent that it’s hard to hide the inten­tion.

The City as an Individual Organism

In the begin­ning, I thought that the goal would’ve been to focus on col­lec­tive hap­pi­ness. But what I found was you can actu­al­ly give some­one every­thing that you would think that they need to be hap­py and they’ll find ways to be unhap­py.

What Do Community and the Social Landscape Look Like in Space?

Community is always part of a sys­tem that we some­times can or can­not see or rec­og­nize. And in Gerard O’Neill’s pro­pos­als for these islands in space, those communities…were sup­posed to per­form a very spe­cif­ic func­tion in a larg­er sys­tem. They were sup­posed to be exper­i­ments.

The Conversation #58 – Jason Kelly Johnson

I think our work is much more inter­est­ed in ques­tion­ing the notion that archi­tec­ture is a sta­t­ic enti­ty. Part of our think­ing in terms of archi­tec­ture is how we make a build­ing breathe. How do we give a build­ing a kind of like, almost a ner­vous sys­tem.

Living in Information

The fram­ing of what we design is very impor­tant to how we go about it. We have not been fram­ing these things as con­texts. We’ve been fram­ing them as prod­ucts, ser­vices, and a whole oth­er series of terms that are— Tools, for exam­ple. And these are things that are most­ly trans­ac­tion­al. They’re not things that are meant to be inhab­it­ed.

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