World Economic Forum Annual Meeting 2016 (Page 3 of 3)

Manufacturing Dreams

presented by Dan Yang

We used to think that sleep is a pas­sive process caused by reduced sen­so­ry stim­u­la­tion so that our nor­mal men­tal and phys­i­cal activ­i­ties can shut down. We held this belief since the time of Aristotle, and per­haps even before that. But now we know that this idea is com­plete­ly wrong.

Verifying and Validating Machine Intelligence

presented by Andrew Moore

We’ve been build­ing autonomous vehi­cles for about twenty-five years, and now that the tech­nol­o­gy has become adopt­ed much more broad­ly and is on the brink of being deployed, our earnest fac­ul­ty who’ve been look­ing at it are now real­ly inter­est­ed in ques­tions like, a car sud­den­ly real­izes an emer­gency, an ani­mal has just jumped out at it. There’s going to be a crash in one sec­ond from now. Human ner­vous sys­tem can’t deal with that fast enough. What should the car do?

Transforming the Classroom with Ubiquitous Sensing

presented by Amy Ogan

Education has remained large­ly unchanged for mil­len­nia. In any class­room, you see a set of stu­dents gath­ered around a teacher who’s writ­ing on the board, or maybe now we’ve added a PowerPoint deck. But, as in many oth­er fields that have been slow to change, the data rev­o­lu­tion is com­ing for edu­ca­tion.

Making an Ethical Machine

presented by Alan Winfield

The idea of putting a robot sim­u­la­tor inside a robot, well, it’s not a new idea but it’s tricky and very few peo­ple have pulled it off. In fact, it takes a bit of get­ting your head round. The robot needs to have, inside itself, a sim­u­la­tion of itself and its envi­ron­ment, and oth­ers in its envi­ron­ment. And run­ning in real-time as well.

Cybersecurity in the Age of Always-Connected Sensors

presented by Anthony Rowe

We all see the ben­e­fits of active safe­ty sys­tems in cars. But that same safe­ty tech­nol­o­gy, if attacked, can actu­al­ly allow you to immo­bi­lize a vehi­cle or even dis­able breaks while dri­ving.

Personal Privacy Assistants in the Age of the Internet of Things

presented by Lorrie Faith Cranor

Imagine your pri­va­cy assis­tant is a com­put­er pro­gram that’s run­ning on your smart­phone or your smart­watch. Your pri­va­cy assis­tant lis­tens for pri­va­cy poli­cies that are being broad­cast over a dig­i­tal stream. We are build­ing stan­dard for­mats for these pri­va­cy poli­cies so that all sen­sors will speak the same lan­guage that your per­son­al pri­va­cy assis­tant will be able to under­stand.

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