The Nexus Institute (Page 2 of 3)

Nihilism and Human Nature: Good or Bad?

presented by Edoardo Albinati, Leon Wieseltier, Nadine Labaki, Rob Riemen

I’m very dif­fi­dent towards val­ues, any kind of. Because you know, val­ues can be very dan­ger­ous. And as the poem of Yeats says, the pas­sion­ate inten­si­ty in believ­ing in some­thing can be very dan­ger­ous.

The Nexus Institute The Battle Between Good and Evil” con­fer­ence keynote

presented by Marilynne Robinson

Modern Western soci­eties are not organ­isms that thrive or per­ish as one thing, one mind, one expe­ri­ence. They are com­pacts, based on the expec­ta­tion that those charged with respon­si­bil­i­ties will car­ry them out in good faith, and cru­cial­ly that those who are rel­a­tive­ly pow­er­ful will not seri­ous­ly abuse, exploit, or sim­ply neglect those who are rel­a­tive­ly vul­ner­a­ble.

Evgeny Morozov on Silicon Valley Solutionism

presented by Evgeny Morozov

There is this bias in soci­ety that as long as you have more infor­ma­tion things are auto­mat­i­cal­ly bet­ter because you have more knowl­edge. It’s a bias that goes all the way back to the Enlightenment.

Evgeny Morozov on the Kingdom of Geeks

presented by Evgeny Morozov

There is this very bizarre alliance between world-changing geeks on the one hand and pol­i­cy­mak­ers who only care about out­comes. They no longer care about how those out­comes are arrived at. They have stripped pol­i­tics of all mean­ing. All they want is to get peo­ple to do the right thing. They don’t care why they do it.

Roger Scruton on Alternatives to Idealism

presented by Roger Scruton

The 20th cen­tu­ry was cre­at­ed by ide­al­ism. Communism and fas­cism and Nazism are all based on ide­al­ized sys­tems, what the world should be ide­al­ly, and how it isn’t what it should be, and there­fore we’re enti­tled to change it rad­i­cal­ly and take con­trol of it in order to do so.

Parag Khanna on the Ideal World

presented by Parag Khanna

For most peo­ple on an indi­vid­ual lev­el most the time, their future still feels very dif­fer­ent from that of oth­er peo­ple. We live in a world, for exam­ple, of enor­mous income inequal­i­ty, right. So even though there is a glob­al econ­o­my, it cer­tain­ly does­n’t feel like one’s sort of day-to-day fate or des­tiny is linked to those of peo­ple around the world, even if it is in very invis­i­ble kinds of ways.

Steven Pinker on Why Doom is not Inevitable

presented by Steven Pinker

I don’t think that any­thing will save the world in the sense of bring­ing Utopia to Earth. But I think the world could be improved, and that would be the ver­sion of the ques­tion that I’m very much inter­est­ed in.

Margaret Atwood on Fiction, the Future, and the Environment

presented by Margaret Atwood

We have already changed the world a lot, not always for the bet­ter. Some of it’s for the bet­ter, as far as we human beings are con­cerned. But every time we invent a new tech­nol­o­gy, we like to play with that tech­nol­o­gy, and we don’t always fore­see the con­se­quences.

John Gray on Man, Beliefs, and Changes

presented by John Gray

One of the prob­lems here, of course, is that there’s no we.” Who’s we? I mean, human­i­ty’s composed—the human species is composed—of bil­lions of sep­a­rate indi­vid­u­als with dif­fer­ent goals, dif­fer­ent plans, dif­fer­ent val­ues, and dif­fer­ent ideals.

Steven Pinker on Genetically Re-engineering Human Nature

presented by Steven Pinker

There are many changes to our insti­tu­tions and our norms and our ideas that can reduce or elim­i­nate the risks of nuclear war with­out what I con­sid­er a rather quixot­ic attempt to change the course of human evo­lu­tion.