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Solarpunk : A Grand Dress Rehearsal

Many of the con­cerns of the cyber­punk genre have come true. The rise of cor­po­rate pow­er, ubiq­ui­tous com­pu­ta­tion, and the like. Robot limbs and cool VR gog­gles. But in many ways, it’s far far worse.

A Waste of Waste

My job is to work with cooks to fig­ure out the sci­ence behind food and cook­ing. But some­thing that we’re also inter­est­ed in with my job is using the knowl­edge that we pro­duce by doing that to improve the world.

A Future with­out Waste

What I want to tell you is that in 2050 we don’t even have waste any­more. There will be no waste in 2050. Everything will be seen as a trea­sure, because we will have cre­at­ed what some smart peo­ple call a cir­cu­lar econ­o­my.

ASU KEDtalks: Change Everything, All At Once

We live in a world of wild, dam­ag­ing, unsus­tain­able excess. We’re sur­round­ed by unhealthy food options. We live in places built for cars, not for walk­ing or bik­ing. We’re buried in our screens 247. We face calls to buy stuff, end­less­ly. And we live in a con­sumer cul­ture that is depen­dent on the notion of dis­pos­al. But here’s the thing. These excess­es are so ful­ly nor­mal­ized, they so ful­ly meet our expec­ta­tions of how every­day life ought to look, that we no longer real­ly see them as exces­sive at all.

Data & Society Databite #119: Mary L. Gray on Ghost Work

I’m just going to say it, I would like to com­plete­ly blow up employ­ment clas­si­fi­ca­tion as we know it. I do not think that defin­ing full-time work as the place where you get ben­e­fits, and part-time work as the place where you have to fight to get a full-time job, is an appro­pri­ate way of address­ing this labor mar­ket.

Living in Information

The fram­ing of what we design is very impor­tant to how we go about it. We have not been fram­ing these things as con­texts. We’ve been fram­ing them as prod­ucts, ser­vices, and a whole oth­er series of terms that are— Tools, for exam­ple. And these are things that are most­ly trans­ac­tion­al. They’re not things that are meant to be inhab­it­ed.

The Conversation #53 — Carlos Perez de Alejo

I per­son­al­ly think that we need to move beyond this sort of grow or die moti­va­tion that exists with­in the cur­rent econ­o­my. And I think that the coop­er­a­tive mod­el is suit­ed to address­ing those con­cerns, espe­cial­ly because the co-op mod­el is geared toward serv­ing mem­ber needs and not dri­ven by prof­it at the end of the day. That is some­thing that bodes well for the mod­el in terms of sus­tain­abil­i­ty.

The Conversation #46 — Mark Mykleby

Today, in America right now, we only can think of growth in quan­ti­ta­tive terms. And in a resource-constrained envi­ron­ment, how frickin’ stu­pid is that? You’re actu­al­ly impos­ing your own death sen­tence by not being able to get over the grip of this quan­ti­ta­tive dynam­ic.

The Conversation #41 — John Fullerton

I actu­al­ly think you can trace many many of these big sys­temic crises to being symp­toms of the flawed idea that eco­nom­ic growth can go on indef­i­nite­ly, expo­nen­tial­ly, on a finite plan­et. That’s sort of my North Star. And then as a finance per­son, why do we think we need eco­nom­ic growth? Well, because the way our cap­i­tal sys­tem works is that cap­i­tal demands that growth.

The Conversation #40 — Mary Mattingly

It’s inter­est­ing and scary to think about an Earth that could be com­plete­ly con­trolled by humans, but it seems like it’s def­i­nite­ly pos­si­ble. I could find fun think­ing about liv­ing under the sea or all the places that humans real­ly haven’t been able to sus­tain them­selves in very well. Like, if we could real­ly get con­trol of that. I mean, it’s def­i­nite­ly a dark future, but I think some­thing that I could embrace if we did go there.

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