Archive (Page 2 of 4)

Richard Stallman’s Internet Hall of Fame 2013 Induction Speech

So, thir­ty years ago if you want­ed to get a new com­put­er and use it you had to sur­ren­der your free­dom by installing a user-subjugating pro­pri­etary oper­at­ing sys­tem. So I decid­ed to fix that by devel­op­ing anoth­er oper­at­ing sys­tem and make it free, and it’s called GNU, but most the time you’ll hear peo­ple erro­neous­ly call­ing it Linux.

Decoding Workforce Productivity: Nita A. Farahany

Are there any lim­its to the con­nect­ed work­place? Are there any con­cerns about the con­nect­ed work­place? Is there any way in which you wouldn’t want either your­self or an employ­ee to be con­nect­ed? Are there any lim­its to the kinds of infor­ma­tion we can gath­er in order to make our work­forces more pro­duc­tive? In order to make our over­all soci­ety more productive?

Forbidden Research: Against the Law: Countering Lawful Abuses of Digital Surveillance

When I announced the talk on Twitter, some­body imme­di­ate­ly was like, Lawful abuse, isn’t that a con­tra­dic­tion?” But if you think about it for just a moment it might seem to be a lit­tle bit more clear. After all, the legal­i­ty of a thing is quite dis­tinct from the moral­i­ty of it.

Forbidden Research Welcome and Introduction: Cory Doctorow

At that moment when every­body is sud­den­ly car­ing about this stuff, that’s the moment at which nihilism can be avert­ed. It’s the moment in which nihilism must be avert­ed if you’re going to make a change. Peak indif­fer­ence is the moment when you stop con­vinc­ing peo­ple to care about an issue, and start con­vinc­ing them to do some­thing about it.

What Will Cybersecurity Look Like in the Next Decade?

Sure, cyber­space is about peo­ple and data. But it is also about appli­ca­tions. And devices. And the indi­rect and non-obvious rela­tion­ships between all of this. It cre­ates a very com­pli­cat­ed and excit­ing ecosys­tem. One that is capa­ble of dra­mat­ic inno­va­tion, and dra­mat­ic exploitation.

Hearsay Culture #252 — Prof. Ben Peters on the History of the Failed Soviet Internet

The Soviet expe­ri­ence sug­gests some­thing real­ly impor­tant for us today, which is that net­works are entire­ly com­pat­i­ble with sur­veil­lance. And many of our favorite things to talk about, then, peer-to-peer pro­duc­tion, or end-to-end intel­li­gence, kind of missed the point that I think is now obvi­ous. That whether you’re the NSA or Google or who­ev­er else…you’re a gen­er­al sec­re­tari­at, seek­ing to pri­va­tize our pow­er, and you are sur­veilling us, because you have a net­work in place. 

Holding To Account

I’m glad those social net­works pro­vide those ser­vices. I think it’s impor­tant for the dia­logue to hap­pen that way. But it can’t be the only way for us to have pub­lic dis­course. Online, we only have these spaces that are owned by pri­vate com­pa­nies. We don’t have pub­lic parks.

Who’s Killing Crypto?

Encryption is a key piece of a robust enter­prise approach to cyber­se­cu­ri­ty. It keeps down the num­ber of data breach­es as the scale and the size of data breach­es con­tin­ues only to grow. It also is the first line of defense that users have against peo­ple access­ing their data on an indi­vid­ual level. 

Biased Data Panel Q&A

We’re los­ing our abil­i­ty to for­get the things that should be for­got­ten. Wait until you try to run for Senate or Congress, some of you in this room, and some pic­tures or text roll up.

Where to From Here?

Although we haven’t reached peak sur­veil­lance, we’ve reached peak indif­fer­ence to sur­veil­lance. There will nev­er be anoth­er day in which few­er peo­ple give a shit about this because there’ll nev­er be a day in which few­er people’s lives have been ruined by this.

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