Archive

Beyond Biocentricity in Design & Pedagogy

Today, we will exam­ine the his­tor­i­cal and philo­soph­i­cal roots of bio­cen­trism, bio­mimicry, explore the qual­i­ty of the rela­tion­ship it pre­sup­pos­es with nature, and ques­tion its ecofriend­li­ness. We will intro­duce emerg­ing alter­na­tives to bio­mimicry and dis­cuss the chal­lenges it promis­es.

Architectural Futures, Public Infrastructure + The Green New Deal pan­el dis­cus­sion

Latour spent his career, or has spent his career argu­ing that sci­en­tif­ic facts need to be seen as a prod­uct of sci­en­tif­ic inquiry. In his terms that they’re net­worked, mean­ing that they stood or fell not on their strength or inher­ent verac­i­ty but on the strength of the insti­tu­tions and prac­tices that pro­duced them. And so, in a pan­el ses­sion that’s dis­cussing archi­tec­tur­al futures, I wan­na ask how we can address roles of our insti­tu­tions and prac­tices in shap­ing these future real­i­ties.

The Ideas of John Perry Barlow in Uncertain Times

If you’re look­ing to the ques­tion how can the whole thing be reg­u­lat­ed, how can one get con­trol of this whole envi­ron­ment, so as to cre­ate a world in which those orig­i­nal free­doms that Barlow was talk­ing about are shared by every­one, the answer is you can’t do it.

ASU KEDtalks: Designing Earth’s Future

Geologists are try­ing to rec­og­nize the mag­ni­tude of this change by giv­ing our epoch a spe­cial name: the Anthropocene,” the age of humans. Some peo­ple find this depress­ing because they think that the Anthropocene is inevitably a bad thing. But it’s not. Because we aren’t bac­te­ria. Those brains that give us the abil­i­ty to har­ness ener­gy also give us the abil­i­ty to shape the way the plan­et is trans­formed. We can design our future.

Programming is Forgetting: Toward a New Hacker Ethic

I would­n’t be sur­prised to find out that many of us here today like to see our work as a con­tin­u­a­tion of say the Tech Model Railroad Club or the Homebrew Computer Club, and cer­tain­ly the ter­mi­nol­o­gy and the val­ues of this con­fer­ence, like open source for exam­ple, have their roots in that era. As a con­se­quence it’s easy to inter­pret any crit­i­cism of the hack­er ethic—which is what I’m about to do—as a kind of assault.

Transforming the Classroom with Ubiquitous Sensing

Education has remained large­ly unchanged for mil­len­nia. In any class­room, you see a set of stu­dents gath­ered around a teacher who’s writ­ing on the board, or maybe now we’ve added a PowerPoint deck. But, as in many oth­er fields that have been slow to change, the data rev­o­lu­tion is com­ing for edu­ca­tion.

Nettrice Gaskins on Techno-Vernacular Creativity and STEAM

I think the part that engages stu­dents that are from under­rep­re­sent­ed eth­nic groups is miss­ing. I think they don’t see them­selves reflect­ed, don’t see their inter­ests or their cul­tures reflect­ed, so they stay out­side of it even if it’s free, or even if it’s some­thing that is in their neigh­bor­hood.

Marika Cifor at Biased Data

What I’m argu­ing pri­mar­i­ly today is that focus­ing on ped­a­gogy is a key aspect of social jus­tice work, and that teach­ing crit­i­cal data lit­er­a­cy along with oth­er dig­i­tal lit­er­a­cy skills is a key part of what we need to do.