Archive

Living in Information

The fram­ing of what we design is very impor­tant to how we go about it. We have not been fram­ing these things as con­texts. We’ve been fram­ing them as prod­ucts, ser­vices, and a whole oth­er series of terms that are— Tools, for exam­ple. And these are things that are most­ly trans­ac­tion­al. They’re not things that are meant to be inhab­it­ed.

The Conversation #5 — Andrew Keen

We’ve got two para­dox­i­cal trends hap­pen­ing at the same time. The first is what I call in my book the cult of the social,” the idea that on the net­work, every­thing has to be social and that the more you reveal about your­self the bet­ter off you are. So if your friends could know what your musi­cal taste is, where you live, what you’re wear­ing, what you’re think­ing, that’s a good thing, this cult of shar­ing. So that’s one thing that’s going on. And the oth­er thing is an increas­ing­ly rad­i­cal­ized indi­vid­u­al­ism of con­tem­po­rary, par­tic­u­lar­ly dig­i­tal, life. And these things seem to sort of coex­ist, which is para­dox­i­cal and it’s some­thing that I try to make sense of in my book.

Gradualism (and its dis­con­tents)

What I want to talk about is some­thing that has plagued me and con­cerned me for a long time now, which I guess one tech­ni­cal term for it is grad­u­al­ism,” how much worse things have got­ten very slow­ly. And I think it’s real­ly true in the privacy/security area. It’s true in a lot of places that have to do with tech­nol­o­gy because nor­mal peo­ple are a lit­tle intim­i­dat­ed by it and they don’t know enough to know what they should be watch­ing out for.