Archive (Page 2 of 3)

The Conversation #26 — Jenny Lee

The worst-case sce­nar­io for Detroit would be that the archi­tec­ture of the Internet as it is now con­tin­ues, and Detroiters’ sto­ries, voic­es, lives, are absent. And the New York Times sto­ry about the cre­ative class sav­ing Detroit, or the doc­u­men­tary about the aban­don­ment and whole­sale destruc­tion of Detroit that por­trays it as a waste­land and a blank can­vas ready for entre­pre­neuri­al exploita­tion, that those sto­ries are defin­ing the nation­al, the glob­al imag­i­na­tion of what Detroit is. And that those sto­ries, they don’t use influ­ence people’s desire to come here and do those things and live that life, though that’s part of it, but it also shapes the per­cep­tion of peo­ple inside the city.

The Conversation #19 — Joseph Tainter

I see a set of con­straints fac­ing us in the future, and they’re all going to be very expen­sive. First is fund­ing retire­ments for the Baby Boom gen­er­a­tion. Second is con­tin­u­ing increas­es in the costs of health­care. The third is replac­ing decay­ing infra­struc­ture. The fourth is adapt­ing to cli­mate change and repair­ing envi­ron­men­tal dam­age. The fifth is devel­op­ing new sources of ener­gy. The six­th is what I see as in all like­li­hood con­tin­u­ing high mil­i­tary costs. The sev­en­th is the costs of inno­va­tion.

The Conversation #20 — David Miller

I enjoy clean air and clean water as much as the most rabid envi­ron­men­tal per­son. I just think we can have the prod­ucts of soci­ety, as well as hav­ing the­se things. Progress is a good thing. I’m just sim­ply a real­ist. And I’m just try­ing to enjoy life, enjoy fam­i­ly, enjoy friends, and con­tribute to soci­ety as best I can. And I think pro­vid­ing ener­gy, I think pro­vid­ing the met­als that soci­ety con­sumes, that peo­ple have in their their iPads, in their iPods, in their iPhones… I think that’s an hon­or­able thing to do. What else would you do? You know, why fight that?

Four Trends for the Digital World

This quote’s from Andy Warhol. He was look­ing at America and say­ing America’s dif­fer­ent. He’s say­ing, Well, Elizabeth Taylor’s drink­ing Coke and I’m drink­ing Coke and the bum on the street’s drink­ing Coke, and it’s all the same thing.” For the first time in his­to­ry, mass mar­ket cul­ture has allowed us all to enjoy the same thing. This is not cham­pag­ne. The bum on the street can’t afford cham­pag­ne.

Digital Privacy IRL

As we’re giv­ing our homes this new lay­er of smart­ness and intel­li­gence, we’re giv­ing away its own­er­ship to very large orga­ni­za­tions. And as we become a gen­er­a­tion of renters, what I’m very inter­est­ed in is how do land­lords respond to that?

Infrastructure and Systems for a Nine Billion World

This is a com­plete­ly new kind of design chal­lenge. There’s no way that you can take the civ­i­liza­tion we have and re-scale it for 110 kilo­grams of cop­per per human per life­time. You have to think in a com­plete­ly dif­fer­ent way if you’re going to oper­ate inside of this frame­work where you take the sus­tain­able har­vest of the Earth and you divide by nine bil­lion.

An Introduction to Infrastructure Fiction

The Someone Else’s Problem Field around infra­struc­ture is, iron­i­cal­ly enough, a mea­sure of infrastructure’s ubiq­ui­ty and suc­cess. You don’t think about infra­struc­ture because you don’t need to. It just works. And when it doesn’t, there’s a phone num­ber you can not both­er call­ing, because they’ll only put you on hold any­way, and by the time you get through it’ll prob­a­bly have fixed itself, so why both­er?

No Neutral Ground in a Burning World

Geek cul­ture and hack­er cul­ture used to be rel­a­tive­ly apo­lit­i­cal, but now every action that you take and every piece of code that you write has polit­i­cal effects. You may may intend some of the­se effects, you may not intend most of the­se effects, but they’re there and we need to start think­ing about and under­stand­ing the­se changes.

Bad Nomadism

Sketching the talk out last night, I decid­ed […] to sum­ma­rize briefly, reflect­ing back on every­thing that I’ve built recent­ly. It can kind of be sum­ma­rized as the infra­struc­ture by which I (and oth­ers) wish to live doesn’t exist; so we’ve no choice but to build it our­selves.” I kind of describe this and a lot of the oth­er things I do at this present moment as being the soft end of stack­tivism.

Ingrid Burrington at Deep Lab

So much of the work that is being done by the gov­ern­ment is actu­al­ly being done by third par­ties, and it’s a very lucra­tive busi­ness. So I went to this office park and kind of just walked around it, and it’s bor­ing. It’s real­ly kind of weird and bor­ing and it’s weird to think about the fact that the­se com­pa­nies that are enor­mous and involved in pret­ty unseem­ly shit appear like this, like this kind of crap­py build­ing with this kind of crap­py pub­lic art.

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