Archive

A Globally Just Green New Deal

In a world of globally-dispersed sup­ply chains, an ener­gy tran­si­tion in the United States has impli­ca­tions for the extrac­tion, pro­duc­tion, and dis­tri­b­u­tion of resources and tech­nol­o­gy in places well beyond US bor­ders.

Planning the Green New Deal
Climate Justice and the Politics of Sites and Scales

The urgency of cli­mate change and the rise of a grass­roots leg­isla­tive polit­i­cal envi­ron­men­tal move­ment in the United States should change the way urban plan­ners think and act on spa­tial change and social jus­tice.

Labor, Architecture and the Green New Deal

The main thing that we need to be doing is work­ing as a dis­ci­pline, as a pro­fes­sion, as a uni­fied voice, so that we sit at the table of pol­i­cy­mak­ing and are believed as not just ambulance-chasers for work for our­selves but as peo­ple with knowl­edge and what­ev­er embed­ded­ness in the com­mu­ni­ty, and our design exper­tise with­in the com­mu­ni­ty is absolute­ly essen­tial.

An Innovation Policy for the Green New Deal

By inno­va­tion pol­i­cy what we’re real­ly talk­ing about is fed­er­al R&D pro­grams. So despite the American econ­o­my’s rep­u­ta­tion for being this quin­tes­sen­tial free mar­ket sys­tem, much of the inno­va­tion and tech­no­log­i­cal devel­op­ment in the American econ­o­my can be linked to direct gov­ern­ment inter­ven­tion.

Design and the Green New Deal

I think that Damian asked me here in large part to talk about this essay from last spring in Places Journal that begins pret­ty timid­ly with this line, I don’t know when the myth of design­ers as cli­mate sav­iors began, but I know that it’s time to kill it. Which as you can imag­ine got me invit­ed to lots of din­ner par­ties at Harvard.

Climate Futures II Introductions

There’s much intel­lec­tu­al, cul­tur­al, and cre­ative work to do. But it’s real­ly impor­tant as well that we leave room for debate, dis­cus­sion, pro­duc­tive cri­tique, etc. So this event is not about the final moment. It’s not going to resolve nice­ly flu­id dis­ci­pli­nary dis­cus­sions. But it is going to be a kind of jam­boree of kind of con­flict­ing, inter­est­ing, diverse per­spec­tives on post-carbon futures and so on.

ASU KEDtalks: Carbon is a Terrible Thing to Waste

For this the­o­ret­i­cal physi­cist here it seemed actu­al­ly very sim­ple. It’s a con­ser­va­tion law. If you take car­bon out of the ground and you put it into the sys­tem it will stay there unless you take it back out. From a soci­etal per­spec­tive, this is much much more com­pli­cat­ed because as we fix it there will be win­ners and losers.

The Conversation #37 — David Keith

There are biol­o­gists who’ve spent their careers work­ing on some species of bee­tle in the trop­i­cal rain­for­est, and they just love the rain­for­est in their bones And they feel that when they go tes­ti­fy in Congress to some com­mit­tee, that they can’t just say, I love it in my bones and you guys will love it too, if you share it with me.” They have to say, Oh, we’ve done all this math and com­put­ed that there’s an ecosys­tem ser­vice here.” And I think that that has real­ly impov­er­ished our debate about envi­ron­men­tal issues.