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ASU KEDtalks: Solving the Unsolvable Problem

Today we face many high­ly com­plex chal­lenges both nation­al­ly and inter­na­tion­al­ly. From secu­ri­ty of our infor­ma­tion net­works, to plan­ning for and man­ag­ing nat­ur­al dis­as­ters, to emer­gence of new infec­tious dis­eases, to social and polit­i­cal con­flict through­out the world, these chal­lenges are messy, and high­ly inter­con­nect­ed.

Response to Tarleton Gillespie’s The Relevance of Algorithms”

It seems to me that to con­front algo­rithms on their own terms, we may have to mod­i­fy our pre­oc­cu­pa­tion with the pol­i­tics of knowl­edge and take up an inter­est in the pol­i­tics of logis­ti­cal engi­neer­ing.

Fran Allen Keynote, Grace Hopper Celebration 2008

What I believe is that com­put­er sci­ence emerged as a sci­ence, as a pro­fes­sion, with all the require­ments on what pro­fes­sion­al stan­dards and require­ments of what one need­ed to know to get a job in the field. […] In that peri­od, then, cre­den­tials were estab­lished, and by the ear­ly 70s things had real­ly changed for women, at least in my envi­ron­ment, and most oth­er groups that I’ve talked to about this the­o­ry absolute­ly agree that that was where there was a sig­nif­i­cant shift.