Archive

Certain Blacks: Future Frames from the Liberated Zone

I want us to play togeth­er… I’ve been think­ing a lot about the black future. One, because I want to have one. Personally, I would like a black future. Because I want a future. And then I was think­ing about just how many folks don’t actu­al­ly put black and the future togeth­er.

1983: A Blackened Window on the World

Rammellzee […] con­sid­ered graf­fi­ti as virus­es. And what he liked to do was to con­nect his pro­duc­tion to mil­i­tary lan­guage. He was say­ing that the graf­fi­ti artists were in a kind of sym­bol­ic cam­paign again­st the stan­dard­iza­tion of the alpha­bet.

Nettrice Gaskins on Techno-Vernacular Creativity and STEAM

I think the part that engages stu­dents that are from under­rep­re­sent­ed eth­nic groups is miss­ing. I think they don’t see them­selves reflect­ed, don’t see their inter­ests or their cul­tures reflect­ed, so they stay out­side of it even if it’s free, or even if it’s some­thing that is in their neigh­bor­hood.

Haunted Machines Afternoon Panel

The whole point of myth is that it’s just the kind of ambi­ent stuff of cul­ture that you can reach out and do what­ev­er you need to do with. Yes, it means things, sort of, it has dis­po­si­tions, it has ten­den­cies, but you could rewrite all of that.

Chardine Taylor Stone at Haunted Machines

Afrofuturism is real­ly about the black body and the black mind see­ing itself put into a space that is beyond the white suprema­cist struc­ture that we’re cur­rent­ly in at the moment.

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