New America (Page 1 of 4)

What Sci‐Fi Futures Can (and Can’t) Teach Us About AI Policy, open­ing and clos­ing com­ments

presented by Ed Finn, Kevin Bankston

AI Policy Futures is a research effort to explore the rela­tion­ship between sci­ence fic­tion around AI and the social imag­i­nar­ies of AI. What those social mea­sures can teach us about real tech­nol­o­gy pol­i­cy today. We seem to tell the same few sto­ries about AI, and they’re not very help­ful.

Bridging AI Fact and Fiction

presented by Ed Finn, Kristin Sharp, Malka Older, Molly Wright Steenson, Stephanie Dinkins

This is going to be a con­ver­sa­tion about sci­ence fic­tion not just as a cul­tur­al phe­nom­e­non, or a body of work of dif­fer­ent kinds, but also as a kind of method or a tool.

Untold AI — What AI Stories Should We Be Telling Ourselves?

presented by Chris Noessel

How peo­ple think about AI depends large­ly on how they know AI. And to the point, how the most peo­ple know AI is through sci­ence fic­tion, which sort of rais­es the ques­tion, yeah? What sto­ries are we telling our­selves about AI in sci­ence fic­tion?

How Sci‐Fi Reflects Our AI Hopes and Fears

presented by Kanta Dihal

We came up with the idea to write a short paper…trying to make some sense of those many nar­ra­tives that we have around arti­fi­cial intel­li­gence and see if we could divide them up into dif­fer­ent hopes and dif­fer­ent fears.

AI in Reality

presented by Elana Zeide, Lindsey Sheppard, Miranda Bogen, Rumman Chowdhury, Kevin Bankston

When data sci­en­tists talk about bias, we talk about quan­tifi­able bias that is a result of let’s say incom­plete or incor­rect data. And data sci­en­tists love liv­ing in that world—it’s very com­fort­able. Why? Because once it’s quan­ti­fied if you can point out the error you just fix the error. What this does not ask is should you have built the facial recog­ni­tion tech­nol­o­gy in the first place?

AI in Sci‐Fi

presented by Andrew Hudson, Chris Noessel, Damien Williams, Kanta Dihal, Lee Konstantinou, Madeline Ashby

What I hope we can do in this pan­el is have a slight­ly more lit­er­ary dis­cus­sion to try to answer well why were those the sto­ries that we were telling and what has been the point of telling those sto­ries even though they don’t now nec­es­sar­i­ly always align with the pol­i­cy prob­lems that we’re hav­ing.

The Sci‐Fi Feedback Loop

presented by Kevin Bankston

We’re here because the imag­i­nary futures of sci­ence fic­tion impact our real future much more than we prob­a­bly real­ize. There is a pow­er­ful feed­back loop between sci‐fi and real‐world tech­ni­cal and tech pol­i­cy inno­va­tion and if we don’t stop and pay atten­tion to it, we can’t har­ness it to help cre­ate bet­ter fea­tures includ­ing bet­ter and more inclu­sive futures around AI.

Projecting the Future of Cyberspace

presented by Betsy Cooper

What we’re try­ing to do is to see over the hori­zons, look­ing at essen­tial­ly a five‐year time frame, and iden­ti­fy what will be the cyber­se­cu­ri­ty land­scape in that con­text.

Civic Tech for Good

presented by Baratunde Thurston, Vivian Graubard

I was at the White House for almost six years. And most of the time that I was there was spent on try­ing to bring sort of these best prac­tices that we knew worked in the tech indus­try to bear in gov­ern­ment when it came to pol­i­cy imple­men­ta­tion.

The Spawn of Frankenstein: Fear of the Unknown

presented by Annalee Newitz, David Guston, Charlotte Gordon, Jacob Brogan, Bina Venkataraman

It’s not the strange­ness of new tech­nolo­gies that fright­ens us but the way tech­nol­o­gy threat­ens to make us strangers to our­selves. In a semi‐Freudian spir­it, then, I’d like to pro­pose that where Frankenstein and its spawn are con­cerned, our fear of the unknown may real­ly be about our dis­com­fort with know­ing.

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