New America (Page 1 of 3)

Civic Tech for Good

presented by Baratunde Thurston, Vivian Graubard

I was at the White House for almost six years. And most of the time that I was there was spent on try­ing to bring sort of these best prac­tices that we knew worked in the tech indus­try to bear in gov­ern­ment when it came to pol­i­cy implementation.

The Spawn of Frankenstein: Fear of the Unknown

presented by Annalee Newitz, Bina Venkataraman, David Guston, Charlotte Gordon, Jacob Brogan

It’s not the strange­ness of new tech­nolo­gies that fright­ens us but the way tech­nol­o­gy threat­ens to make us strangers to our­selves. In a semi-Freudian spir­it, then, I’d like to pro­pose that where Frankenstein and its spawn are con­cerned, our fear of the unknown may real­ly be about our dis­com­fort with knowing. 

The Spawn of Frankenstein: Unintended Consequences

presented by Cara LaPointe, Joey Eschrich, Samuel Arbesman, Susan Tyler Hitchcock

Victor’s sin wasn’t in being too ambi­tious, not nec­es­sar­i­ly in play­ing God. It was in fail­ing to care for the being he cre­at­ed, fail­ing to take respon­si­bil­i­ty and to pro­vide the crea­ture what it need­ed to thrive, to reach its poten­tial, to be a pos­i­tive devel­op­ment for soci­ety instead of a disaster.

The Spawn of Frankenstein: It’s Alive

presented by Ed Finn

Mary Shelley’s nov­el has been an incred­i­bly suc­cess­ful mod­ern myth. And so this con­ver­sa­tion today is not just about what hap­pened 200 years ago, but the remark­able ways in which that moment and that set of ideas has con­tin­ued to per­co­late and evolve and reform in cul­ture, in tech­no­log­i­cal research, in ethics, since then.

The Spawn of Frankenstein: Playing God

presented by Ed Finn, Josephine Johnston, Nancy Kress, Patric M. Verrone

In Shelley’s vision, Frankenstein was the mod­ern Prometheus. The hip, up to date, learned, vital god who chose to cre­ate human life and paid the dire con­se­quences. To Shelley, gods cre­ate and for humans to do that is bad. Bad for oth­ers but espe­cial­ly bad for one’s creator. 

Rise of the Hacker Industrial Complex

presented by Niloofar Howe

We have basi­cal­ly lost con­trol over our net­work. All of the advances that have made our lives more pro­duc­tive, more acces­si­ble, more con­nect­ed, have fun­da­men­tal­ly dis­in­ter­me­di­at­ed our abil­i­ty to pro­tect our envi­ron­ments. The democ­ra­ti­za­tion of infor­ma­tion, of tech­nol­o­gy, of goods and ser­vices, of bank­ing, of finan­cial trans­ac­tions with blockchain etc., means every aspect of our lives has become acces­si­ble and there­fore vulnerable.

A #Netfreedom Agenda for the 45th POTUS

presented by Amie Stepanovich, Daniel Calingaert, David A. Gross, Nilmini Rubin, Rebecca MacKinnon

In addi­tion to free­dom to con­nect, there also needs to be the abil­i­ty to con­nect, and that we need to mod­el best prac­tice at home and around the world, and the poli­cies that relate to that.

Who and What Will Get to Think the Future?

presented by Ed Finn, Ted Chiang

There’s already a kind of cog­ni­tive invest­ment that we make, you know. At a cer­tain point, you have years of your per­son­al his­to­ry liv­ing in somebody’s cloud. And that goes beyond mere­ly being a mem­o­ry bank, it’s also a cog­ni­tive bank in some way.

Robert Reich’s Advice for the Next President

presented by Robert Reich

The next President is prob­a­bly going to have to deal with some very dif­fi­cult eco­nom­ic times. The hous­ing mar­ket is start­ing to look like a bub­ble. There’s a pos­si­bil­i­ty of that bub­ble burst­ing. We’ve been there before.

Peter W. Singer’s Advice for the Next President

presented by Peter W. Singer

If I had to sug­gest one job for the next President to do for a day, it would be to take on the role of a mil­i­tary spouse whose wife has deployed abroad.

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