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Biases Abound

I’ve expe­ri­enced first hand the chal­lenges of try­ing to cor­rect mis­in­for­ma­tion, and in part my aca­d­e­m­ic research builds on that expe­ri­ence and tries under­stand why it was that so much of what we did at Spinsanity antag­o­nized even those peo­ple who were inter­est­ed enough to go to a fact-checking web site.

The Science of Why We Deny Science and Reality

What is it about our brains that makes facts so chal­leng­ing, so odd and threat­en­ing? Why do we some­times dou­ble down on false beliefs? And maybe why do some of us do it more than oth­ers?

Kai Wright on Elusive Objectivity

I actu­al­ly come at this with a set of ques­tions for folks here. Because before we get to the action ques­tion I have ques­tions about the broad­er prob­lem, right. So when we’re talk­ing about truth and truthi­ness and in media, I think we first have to ask whose truth mat­ters, and what are its bound­aries.

Emily Bell on Elusive Objectivity

This idea of con­trol is so baked into the jour­nal­is­tic psy­chol­o­gy that actu­al­ly this artic­u­la­tion, done in a highly-controlled envi­ron­ment with an adver­tis­ing agency, is one which even though it’s not new to the open Web is still very very very new to jour­nal­ism. And what we don’t have at the moment is any­thing like a bal­anc­ing invest­ment in the kinds of things which allow us to par­tic­i­pate in the crowd.

Kathleen Hall Jamieson on Elusive Objectivity

The dan­ger is that we are tak­ing the agen­da that is being set by those who are the polit­i­cal play­ers, and by check­ing with­in it ignor­ing the things that are con­se­quen­tial that we ought to be debat­ing, that to some extent exist in anoth­er world which is a world about what is desir­able and good, and what the trade-offs actu­al­ly are and how we should arbi­trate those track trade-offs.

Tim Hwang on New Media 360

We iden­ti­fied a group of users on Twitter and we said as a cod­ing chal­lenge, like social bat­tle­bots, write a bot that will embed itself in this net­work and we will score you based on how well these bots are able to achieve some kind of social change, either in the pat­tern of con­nec­tions between peo­ple or in the things that peo­ple talk about.

Filippo Menczer on Truthy Tweeting

I’m here to tell you lit­tle bit about a few exam­ples of truthy memes that we’ve uncov­ered with the sys­tem that we have online. It’s a web site where we track memes com­ing out of Twitter and we try to see if we could spot some sig­na­tures based on the net­works of who retweets what, basi­cal­ly, and who men­tions whom.

Melanie Sloan on New Media 360

As Executive Director of each of these orga­ni­za­tions what Mr. Berman does is he con­tracts with his own pub­lic rela­tions firm, Berman and Company. And all of the staff of Berman and Company then serve as the staff of these dif­fer­ent orga­ni­za­tions, and they will often have very dif­fer­ent titles in all of these dif­fer­ent orga­ni­za­tions but it’s the same group of about four peo­ple.

Money, Power, and the Networked Public Sphere

Bill Keller ends his sto­ry in the end in The New York Times Magazine as, If Assange were an under­stat­ed pro­fes­so­r­i­al type rather than a char­ac­ter from a miss­ing Stieg Larsson nov­el, and if WikiLeaks were not suf­fused with such glib antipa­thy toward the US, would the reac­tion to the leaks be quite so fero­cious?”

Good ques­tion. Who’s respon­si­ble? Half an arti­cle before, Keller says, I came to think of Julian Assange as a char­ac­ter from a Stieg Larsson movie.

Wendell Potter on Deadly Spin

Today, because of the dig­i­tal media, big com­pa­nies are able to get their pro­pa­gan­da direct­ly to their tar­get audi­ences, as I was able to do. They can and they do pub­lish and dis­sem­i­nate their own press releas­es, and their own stud­ies, and their own posi­tion papers. All this means that the con­sumer is often, if not most of the time, at a big dis­ad­van­tage.

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